Search for "chemistry"

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University of New Brunswick Hires World’s First Research Chair in Cannabis Health

Plant biochemist Yang Qu, a specialist in developing anti-cancer medications, was named Canada’s first academic research chair in cannabis health by the University of New Brunswick. The position will straddle the departments of chemistry and chemical engineering and is believed to be the first of its kind in the world.

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Leo Yaffe

Leo Yaffe, OC, FRSC, educator, nuclear scientist, university administrator (born 6 July 1916 in Devil's Lake, North Dakota; died 26 May 1997 in Montreal, QC). Yaffe was an authority in nuclear chemistry and throughout his career he advocated for the peaceful use of atomic energy (see Nuclear Energy). He has been the recipient of many honours and awards.

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Bernard Belleau

Joseph Rolland Bernard Belleau, FRSC, OC, biochemist, medical chemist, (born 15 March 1925 in Montreal, QC; died 4 September 1989 in Sainte-Anne-des-Lacs, QC). Bernard Belleau was a Canadian pioneer in therapeutic chemistry, merging the fields of synthetic chemistry, biochemistry and pharmacology for use in medicine. He is acclaimed for his discovery and synthesis of the drug 3TC (2,3 dideoxy – 3-thiacytidine), also known as lamivudine or Epivir, used as an anti-viral for HIV/AIDS. He also developed butorphanol (Stadol), in the hope of having a non-addictive alternative to morphine, which is used to treat pain. Bernard Belleau’s discoveries have bettered human health and saved millions of lives globally.

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Aluminum in Canada

Aluminum is a lightweight, strong and flexible metal that resists corrosion and is 100 per cent recyclable. It is a common material in vehicles, buildings, consumer goods, packaging, power transmission and electronics. Canada’s aluminum industry began at the turn of the 20th century and grew quickly during both World Wars. Today, Canada is the world’s fourth largest producer and second largest exporter of aluminum. The country nevertheless accounts for less than 5 per cent of global production. Aside from one smelter in Kitimat, British Columbia, all Canadian plants are in the province of Quebec.

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Walter Kohn

Walter Kohn, theoretical physicist, professor, Nobel laureate in chemistry (born 9 March 1923 in Vienna, Austria; died 19 April 2016, Santa Barbara, United States). A refugee in England at the outbreak of the Second World War, Kohn was arrested in 1940 as an “enemy alien” and sent to Canada, where he was held in detention camps until 1942 (see Canada and the Holocaust). After his release, he studied mathematics and physics at the University of Toronto and Harvard University. He taught for many years at the Carnegie Institute of Technology and later at the University of California, San Diego and was the founding director of the Institute for Theoretical Physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Kohn was at the forefront of solid-state physics and quantum chemistry during his scientific career. For his work on “density functional theory” he was named co-recipient of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1998.

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Nobel Prizes and Canada

The Nobel Prizes are awarded annually for achievements that have significantly benefitted humankind. The prizes are among the highest international honours and are awarded in six categories: physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, peace, and economics. They are administered by the Nobel Foundation and awarded by institutions in Sweden and Norway. Eighteen Canadians have won Nobel Prizes, excluding Canadian-born individuals who gave up their citizenship and members of organizations that have won the peace prize.