Browse "Rivers"

Displaying 21-40 of 101 results
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Coppermine River

The Coppermine River, 845 km long, rises in the Barren Lands of the Northwest Territories in Lac de Gras and flows northwest through Point Lake to Coronation Gulf on the Arctic Ocean. The majority of its course lies in Nunavut.

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Toronto Feature: Highland Creek

This text is from the free Toronto in Time app, which was created by The Canadian Encyclopedia and is available from the App Store and the Google Play store. Visit its companion website, which is linked below, to explore all the features of the app online.

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Toronto Feature: Mimico Creek

This text is from the free Toronto in Time app, which was created by The Canadian Encyclopedia and is available from the App Store and the Google Play store. Visit its companion website, which is linked below, to explore all the features of the app online.

Article

St Croix River

St Croix River, 121 km long, rises in the Chiputneticook Lakes and flows SE to Passamaquoddy Bay, forming part of the border between NB and Maine. It was discovered (1604) by the French, and de MONTS built the first settlement in Acadia on Ile Sainte-Croix (now St Croix I) near the river's mouth.

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Rivière de Rupert

Rivière de Rupert is 763 km long to the head of Lac Témiscamie. It drains Lac Mistassini and then follows a twisted course through a series of lakes and across a flat coastal plain to discharge into southeastern James Bay.

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Dean River

Dean River, 241 km long, world-famous steelhead- and salmon-fishing stream, rises in the Fraser Plateau of west-central BC, flows northwest and west through the COAST MOUNTAINS and empties near the head of Dean Channel.

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Red Deer River

The Red Deer River (740 km, mean annual flow rate 62 m3/s), is glacier-fed by streams from Mount Drummond and Cyclone Mountain in the Rockies of Banff National Park in Alberta. It flows east then south to join the South SASKATCHEWAN RIVER just inside Saskatchewan.

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Detroit River

The Detroit River, 52 km long, flows south from Lake ST CLAIR to the west end of Lake ERIE, forming part of the boundary between Ontario and Michigan. Detroit, Michigan, and WINDSOR, Ontario, dominate its shores. Part of the ST LAWRENCE SEAWAY, it is heavily used by commercial traffic.

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Dubawnt River

Dubawnt River, 842 km long, rises from a web of lakes in the Northwest Territories, 120 km northeast of Lake Athabasca

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Rivière Dumoine

The Dumoine, 129 km long, rises in Lac Dumoine in southwest Québec and flows off the south edge of the Laurentian Highlands through a series of waterfalls, wild rapids and long chutes into the Ottawa River.

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Rivière Eastmain

The Rivière Eastmain, 756 km long, rises in the central part of Québec on the side of a low drainage divide from which streams flow west to James Bay.

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Exploits River

The Exploits River, 246 km long is the longest river on the Island of Newfoundland. Its tributaries, the Lloyds and Victoria rivers, rise in the southwest corner of the Island and flow northeast into Red Indian Lake (250 km2).

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Toronto Feature: Humber Marshes

This text is from the free Toronto in Time app, which was created by The Canadian Encyclopedia and is available from the App Store and the Google Play store. Visit its companion website, which is linked below, to explore all the features of the app online.

Article

Fraser River

The Fraser River is the longest river in British Columbia, stretching 1,375 km. It begins on the western side of the Rocky Mountains at Mount Robson Provincial Park, and ends in the Strait of Georgia at Vancouver. Named for explorer Simon Fraser, the river was a transportation route and source of food for the Indigenous people of the region long before Fraser travelled its waters. In 1858, gold was discovered on sandbars south of Yale, setting off the Fraser River Gold rush.

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French River

The French River, 290 km long (to head of Sturgeon River), rises from Lake Nipissing in northeastern Ontario and flows 110 km west towards Georgian Bay.

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Gander River

Gander River, 175 km long, drainage basin 6400 km2, is the principal river of northeast Newfoundland, emptying into Gander Bay. Named for its abundant geese, it rises in the central plateau and eventually falls 427 m to the Atlantic.

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George River

George River, 560 km long, in northern Québec, drains N into the E side of Ungava Bay. Its southern and eastern divides, along with those of tributary rivers Ford and De Pas, extend along much of the Québec-Newfoundland and Labrador border.

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Gold River

Gold River, BC, incorporated as a village in 1972, population 1267 (2011c), 1362 (2006c). The Village of Gold River is located approximately midpoint on the west coast of VANCOUVER ISLAND at the head of Muchalat Inlet in NOOTKA SOUND.