Browse "Rivers"

Displaying 81-100 of 101 results
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Restigouche River

Restigouche River (Ristigouche in Québec), 200 km long, rises in the highlands of northwestern New Brunswick as the Little Main Restigouche River.

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Rivière Richelieu

The Richelieu River has played a prominent role in the historical development of Québec. Originally inhabited by Iroquois, Huron and Algonquin, Samuel de CHAMPLAIN navigated its waters shortly after his arrival in 1608.

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Rideau River

The Rideau River flows 100 km northwards from the Rideau Lakes in eastern Ontario to the Ottawa River at Ottawa.

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Severn River

Severn River, 982 km long, rises in the wooded Shield country of northwestern Ontario and flows northeast through Severn Lake to Hudson Bay.

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Yukon River

At 3,185 km (1,149 km of which lie in Canada), the Yukon River is the fifth-longest river in North America.

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Souris River

Souris River, about 720 km long, rises in the Yellow Grass marshes N of Weyburn, Sask, flows SE past Estevan and wanders S across the N Dakota border before entering Manitoba.

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Soper River

The Soper River winds southwards 108 km through the tundra-covered hills of southern Baffin Island before emptying into Soper Lake, a brackish water body, and then directly into Hudson Strait near the community of Kimmirut, Nunavut.

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Shelburne River

One of the last wilderness rivers in Nova Scotia, the Shelburne River begins in the Tobeatic Wilderness Area, the largest remaining wilderness in the Maritimes.

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Seal River

Named for the harbour seals (normally marine creatures) that are found up to 200 km upstream from Hudson Bay, Manitoba's Seal River is formed by the confluence of the North Seal (about 200 km long) and the South Seal (about 240 km long) rivers at Shethanei Lake.

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South Saskatchewan River

​The South Saskatchewan River (1,392 km long) is a heavily utilized water source in southern Alberta and Saskatchewan and is a major tributary to the Saskatchewan River, ultimately discharging to Hudson Bay. Mean flow is 280 m3/s, but varies throughout the year, largely controlled by several dams and reservoirs along the river system. The South Saskatchewan River flows through an agriculturally productive region and is prone to periodic droughts and floods.

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Vermilion River

Vermilion River, 70 km (from its headstream to its confluence with the Kootenay R), rises in the Continental Ranges on the BC-Alberta border at the N end of KOOTENAY NATIONAL PARK. Fed by Tokumm Cr, it drains in a southerly direction, eventually emptying into the Kootenay R.

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Saskatchewan River

The Saskatchewan River is 1,939 km long from the Rocky Mountains headwaters to Cedar Lake in central Manitoba. When including its longest tributary, the South Saskatchewan River, the Saskatchewan River is the fourth-longest river in Canada. It’s a major tributary to the Nelson River, ultimately draining into Hudson Bay. Its name is derived from the Cree word kisiskâciwanisîpiy meaning swift-flowing river. The Saskatchewan River was a major transportation route for First Nations for thousands of years and was an instrumental transportation and resource corridor during the fur trade and early European exploration.

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Thompson River

Thompson River, 489 km long, rises in the Cariboo district of the Rocky Mountains and flows south as the North Thompson River.

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Winnipeg River

Winnipeg River, 813 km long (to head of Firesteel River), issues from the north end of Lake of the Woods and flows northwest to Lake Winnipeg.

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Skeena River

Skeena River, 580 km long, rises in the northern interior of BC and flows generally SW, draining about 54 000 km2, to meet the Pacific Ocean at Chatham Sound south of Prince Rupert.

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Stikine River

The Stikine River, 539 km long, rises in the Spatsizi Wilderness Park in northwestern British Columbia and flows in a wide arc north and west out of the Stikine Plateau uplands, then south through the spectacular Coast Mountains range to meet the Pacific Ocean near Wrangell, Alaska.

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Thames River

The Thames River begins in a swampy area of southwestern Ontario and meanders quietly for 273 km past the cities of Woodstock, London and Chatham-Kent to empty into Lake St. Clair.