Browse "New France"

Displaying 21-29 of 29 results
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New France

France was a colonial power in North America from the early 16th century, the age of European discoveries and fishing expeditions, to the early 19th century, when Napoléon Bonaparte sold Louisiana to the United States.

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Fur Trade

For nearly 250 years, from the early 17th to the mid-19th centuries, the fur trade was a vast commercial enterprise across the wild, forested expanse of what is now Canada.

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Fur Trade Routes

 Throughout the period of the historical fur trade, water routes were the natural "highways," and canoes (later boats - principally York boats) the vehicles.

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Gouverneur

Gouverneur (governor), the French monarch's official representative in NEW FRANCE. The office, created before a complete system of government had been established, was always granted to a member of the nobility by royal commission, and the appointment could be withdrawn at any time.

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High Wines

Liquor adulterated for use in the fur trade. Fur traders who supplied liquor to the natives often diluted their brandy, rum, whisky, etc, with flavoured water. The term "high wines" is a misnomer, for the trade goods are not wines but spirits.

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King's Posts

King's Posts, a name applied during the French regime to fur trade and fishing posts in the King's Domain.

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King's Presents

The practice of offering regular gifts to Indigenous trading partners and allies, begun by Governor Montmagny in 1648, was, by the end of the 17th century institutionalized as the "Présents du Roy" at the annual meeting with the governor-general of New France at Montréal.

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Seigneurial System

The seigneurial system was an institutional form of land distribution established in New France in 1627 and officially abolished in 1854. In New France, 80 per cent of the population lived in rural areas governed by this system of land distribution and occupation.

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Voyageur

A worker, minor partner in a company or independent contractor involved in the fur trade. Today, the word voyageur, like the term coureur des bois, evokes the romantic image of men canoeing across the continent in search of furs and living a life full of perilous adventure, gruelling work and cheerful camaraderie.