Browse "Law and Policy"

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Keegstra Case

The Keegstra case (1990) dealt with freedom of expression and hate propaganda. James Keegstra, a teacher in a secondary school in Alberta, made anti-Semitic statements in his classes and was accused of having fomented hatred against the Jews.

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Keegstra's Conviction Confirmed

"Moles only come out in the dark when no one is watching. Jews only do their deeds when no one is watching. A mole when mad, will strike back and have no mercy when disturbed. Jews strike at any time and have NO mercy." That excerpt from an examination answer penned by an Eckville, Alta.

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Kindler Case

In the Kindler case (1991), the majority of judges on the Supreme Court ruled that the Canadian procedure in extradition matters did not violate section 7 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms which specifies that everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of the person.

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Lamaze Drug Case

Eric Lamaze walks into his Toronto lawyer's boardroom looking suntanned and refreshed. Amidst the onslaught of probing questions on his drug use and expulsion from the Canadian Olympic equestrian team, the 32-year-old rider speaks calmly - even as he rocks nervously in a chair.

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Latimer Convicted, Again

Robert Latimer watches in detached amusement as a kitten plays with his shoelaces. It is the day after a second jury has found him guilty of second-degree murder, and he is relaxing with half a dozen relatives on the deck in front of his modest farmhouse in Wilkie, Sask.

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Latimer Sentenced

A hundred and seventy years ago in England, about 200 crimes carried the death penalty. People were publicly hanged for offences ranging from murder to the theft of food or pocket change.

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Lavell Case

The Lavell case (AG v. Lavell) was a challenge to Canadian law as it related to Indigenous women’s rights under section 12(1)(b) of the Indian Act. As the case moved through the court system, it merged with R v. Bédard and mounted a significant challenge against the patriarchal (male-dominated) and sexist nature of constitutional law in Canada.

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Lortie Released

Denis Lortie, the former army corporal who murdered three people and injured 13 others after storming the Quebec National Assembly in May, 1984, was released on day parole to a halfway house in Hull, Quebec.

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Maher Arar Case

Maher Arar is a Syrian-born Canadian. In 2002 he was sent by the United States to Syria as an accused terrorist, based on faulty information supplied to US agents by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP). Arar was tortured in Syria before being released and returned to Canada. The federal government paid him $10.5 million in compensation for the wrongs done to him.

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McNeil Case

McNeil Case G. McNeil, a journalist who wanted to see a film (Last Tango in Paris) banned in his province (NS) by a provincial regulatory body, challenged the constitutionality of the provincial Theatres and Amusement Act.

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Michael Wayne McGray Case

Michael Wayne McGray once boasted of being Canada’s worst serial killer. He was convicted of seven homicides but claimed to have committed as many as 11 other murders in Canada and the United States between 1985 and 1998.

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Mike Duffy Case

Senator ​Mike Duffy was charged with crimes following a public scandal over his expense claims. In April 2016, after a high profile trial, he was cleared of all charges.

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Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in Canada

Missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in Canada (MMIWG, formerly MMIW) refers to a human rights crisis that has only recently become a topic of discussion within national media. Indigenous women and communities, women’s groups and international organizations have long called for action into the high and disproportionate rates of violence and the appalling numbers of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in Canada. Prior to the launch of the national public inquiry on 8 December 2015, these calls were continually ignored by the federal government. Described by some as a hidden crisis, Dawn Lavell-Harvard, former president of the Native Women’s Association of Canada, refers to MMIWG as a national tragedy and a national shame. In 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada supported the call for a national public inquiry into the disproportionate victimization of Indigenous women and girls.

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Morin Freed by DNA

What Morin will never get back, of course, is a decade of normal living. He felt like he was "raped" of life, he says now. He has proclaimed his innocence from the moment he was arrested in spring, 1985, for the Oct.

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Murdoch Case

The Murdoch Case was a Supreme Court of Canada case (1975) involving matrimonial property law. Historically, wives could only own property by having it placed in their names or by providing all or part of its purchase price.