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Displaying 241-260 of 1200 results
Article

George Leslie Mackay

George Leslie Mackay, Presbyterian missionary (b at Zorra, Oxford County, Canada W 22 Mar 1844; d in Formosa [Taiwan] 2 June 1901). A graduate student in Edinburgh, Mackay decided to become a missionary after hearing Alexander Duff, the "apostle to India," call for foreign evangelism.

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James Charles McGuigan

James Charles McGuigan, cardinal, archbishop of Toronto (b at Hunter River, PEI 26 Nov 1894; d at Toronto 8 Apr 1974). The shy, anglophilic grandson of Irish Catholics who fled Ulster immediately before the Great Famine, McGuigan graduated from St Dunstan's College and Laval.

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Culture of Acadia

Marginalized by geographic and economic factors, the Acadian regions remained culturally isolated until the middle of the 20th century. Music and folklore were the only widespread forms of artistic expression until the advent of higher education and access to the wider world.

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Inuit Printmaking

While carving is a viable enterprise in most Inuit communities, printmaking requires special skills and sophisticated equipment to compete in an international market.

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Indonesian Canadians

Immigration from Indonesia to Canada began after the Second World War. In the wake of the decolonization process, 300,000 “Indos” (Indische Nederlander), persons of mixed Dutch and Asian ancestry, were repatriated to the Netherlands. Some of them decided to continue their journeys, settling in Australia, the United States and Canada. Throughout the 1960s and early 1970s, political instability also led many Indonesians to immigrate to Canada. According to the 2016 census, 21,395 individuals indicated that they had Indonesian origins. Notable Indonesian Canadians include violin maker Piet Molenaar and Toronto filmmaker Mike Hoolboom.

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Icelandic Canadians

Icelanders, coming by way of Greenland, were the first European visitors to what is now Canada. The 2016 Canadian census reported 101,795 people with Icelandic ethnic origins, and 1440 people whose mother tongue was Icelandic.

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Annie L. Jack

Annie Linda Jack, née Hayr, writer, horticulturist (born 1 January 1839 in Northamptonshire, England; died 15 February 1912 in Châteauguay, Quebec). Canada’s first professional woman garden writer, Annie Jack authored the popular manual The Canadian Garden: A Pocket Help for the Amateur. She was also a widely published poet, gardening columnist and social commentator.

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Anne Lauber

Anne Lauber. Composer, teacher, b Zurich, Switzerland, 28 Jul 1943, naturalized Canadian 1972; M MUS composition (Montreal) 1982, D MUS composition (Montreal) 1986.

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Hutterites in Canada

Hutterites are one of three major Christian Anabaptist sectarian groups (the others are the Mennonites and the Amish) surviving today. They are the only group to strongly insist on the communal form of existence. The 2016 census recorded 370 Hutterite colonies in Canada. The total population living in Hutterite colonies was 35,010 people, with the majority located in Alberta (16, 935), Manitoba (11, 275), and Saskatchewan (6250).

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Dorset Culture

Dorset culture, 500 BC-1500 CE, is known archaeologically from most coastal regions of arctic Canada. The Dorset people were descended from Palaeoeskimos of the Pre-Dorset Culture.

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George John Blewett

George John Blewett, philosopher (b at St Thomas, Ont 9 Dec 1873; d at Go Home Bay, Georgian Bay, Ont 15 Aug 1912). English Canada's first native-born philosopher, he turned down job offers from the US, preferring to teach at Victoria College, Toronto (1906-12).

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François Hertel

François Hertel, pseudonym of Rodolphe Dubé (b at Rivière-Ouelle, Qué 31 May 1905; d at Montréal 4 Oct 1985). At 20 he entered the Jesuits and he was ordained in 1938.

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Moses Harvey

Moses Harvey, clergyman, essayist, naturalist (b at Armagh, Ire 21 Mar 1820; d at St John's 3 Sept 1901). He was of Scottish descent and was ordained a Presbyterian minister in 1844. After serving in Maryport, Eng, he immigrated to Newfoundland in 1852.

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Hippies in Canada

“Hippies” is a term used to describe young people who participated in the 1960s counterculture movement, which originated in the United States and spread throughout Canada in the second half of that decade. As a noun, “hippie” was a play on the adjective “hip,” which was used to describe young bohemians who lived in Greenwich Village in New York City, and in San Francisco, in the 1950s and early 1960s. Hippies were part of the “baby boom” generation, born immediately following the end of the Second World War (see Baby Boomers in Canada). This demographic wave was significant enough to transform Canadian society; by the mid-1960s more than half of Canada’s population of 20 million was under the age of 25.

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Greek Canadians

Greek immigration to Canada began early in the 19th century. Greeks from the islands (e.g., Crete, Syros and Skopelos) and from the Peloponnesus, especially the poor villages of the provinces of Arcadia and Laconia, settled in Montreal as early as 1843. However, in 1871 only 39 persons of Greek origin were known to be living in Canada. Greek immigration, sporadic prior to 1900, increased considerably in the early 20th century as a result of poverty, war and political upheavals at home. The 2016 census recorded 271, 405 Canadians of Greek origin (141,580 single and 129,830 multiple responses.)

Article

Alexander MacMillan

Alexander MacMillan. Presbyterian minister, hymnologist, b Edinburgh 19 Oct 1864, d Toronto 5 Mar 1961; honorary DD (Presbyterian College, Montreal) 1919, honorary D MUS (Toronto) 1943.

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Chinese Music in Canada

The migration of Chinese to Canada began in 1858 as a result of the Fraser River Gold Rush in British Columbia. Most of the 19th-century migrants, including those contracted for CPR labour from 1882 to 1885, came from Kwangtung (Canton) Province, some via the USA.