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Gallinule

Gallinule is a common name for some marsh-dwelling birds of the rail family (Rallidae), now also known as moorhens.

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Gar

Gar, large, slender, thick-scaled, predatory fish of family Lepisosteidae, order Semionotiformes, class Actinopterygii. Gars are found in fresh waters of eastern N America, Central America and Cuba, occasionally in brackish water and, rarely, in the sea.

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Fungus

All members of the kingdom Fungi are commonly known by the same name, fungus. Fungi have some characteristics in common with both PLANTS and ANIMALS, yet most biologists consider them to be an independent group.

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Frog

Frogs are amphibians belonging to the order Anura. The adult, typically, has no tail or ribs, longer hind limbs than forelimbs, well-developed eyes and skin equipped with mucus and venom glands.

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Fossil

  Fossil [Lat fossilis, "dug up"], trace of an ancient animal or plant preserved in the Earth's crust. Palaeontology is the modern, scientific study of fossils, but these curious objects have attracted attention since ancient times.

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Fox

   The fox is a small, carnivorous MAMMAL of the DOG family. Four species inhabit Canada: red or coloured, swift, grey, and Arctic foxes (Vulpes vulpes, V. velox, Urocyon cinereoargenteus, Alopex lagopus, respectively).

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Grasses

Emergence of GrasslandsGrasslands began to appear about 25 million years ago, changing the face of much of the world and providing food for grazing animals. Grasses and grazers evolved together. Grasses benefit because grazers control the growth of competing species and provide fertilizers.

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Hare (Mammal)

Hare is a term applied to midsized herbivores of the order Lagomorpha whose young are born fully haired, with eyes open, and able to run about a few minutes after birth.

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Geology

Earth is 70.8% covered by water, but only with the development of sonar techniques has it become possible to describe the solid earth below the oceans. With increasingly sophisticated satellite observations, relatively fine structural details (eg, areas of volcanic activity) can be seen.

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Resource Use

Since prehistoric times, the inhabitants of what is now Canada used vegetation and animals for food, clothing and shelter. They fashioned implements and ornaments from MINERALS and, after the arrival of Europeans, used furs for trading.

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Falcon

    The falcon (family Falconidae) is a small to medium-sized predatory bird noted for its swiftness in flight.

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Endive

Endive, or escarole (Cichorium endivia), herbaceous biennial vegetable belonging to the Compositae family.

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Department of Natural Resources

The Department of Natural Resources was established in 1993, replacing Energy, Mines and Resources as a federal agency. Some of the department's components have long histories. The Department of Mines, created in 1907, was reorganized as the Department of Mines and Resources in 1936.

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Energy in Society

Energy plays a unique and critical role in the world; no activity of any kind (no "work") can take place without the movement or conversion of energy.

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Nightshade

Eight species of Solanum occur in Canada, of which only S. carolinense (horse or ball nettle), found in southern Ontario, is native. The most familiar nightshade found across Canada is S. dulcamara (climbing nightshade or European bittersweet).

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Fireweed

Fireweed, common name for Epilobium angustifolium, a member of a genus of herbaceous or shrubby plants of the evening primrose family (Onagraceae).

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Fern

Fern, common name for a diverse group (division Polypodiophyta) of usually perennial, spore-producing plants with divided, evergreen or deciduous leaves (fronds) arising from slender, horizontal rhizomes (underground stems) or stout, ascending rootstalks.