timeline

Elections and Prime Ministers

This timeline lists events related to elections and Prime Ministers in Canada.

The Senate Chambers on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, ON.

January 24, 1848

Sir Louis-Hippolyte LaFontaine

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Reform Victory in Canada

Election returns resulted in an overwhelming Reform victory in both Canada East and Canada West. Louis LaFontaine became premier, Robert Baldwin co-premier.

March 04, 1865

Sir Samuel Leonard Tilley

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Tilley Defeated in NB

The New Brunswick government, led by pro-Confederation Leonard Tilley, was defeated in the only election held on the issue of Confederation.

July 01, 1867

Sir John A. Macdonald, Canada's First Prime Minister

Elections and Prime Ministers 

John A. Macdonald Becomes First PM

John A. Macdonald became the first prime minister of Canada.

August 07, 1867

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Conservatives Win First Majority

In the first general election after Confederation, the Conservatives won a majority with 101 seats to the Liberals' 80; Sir John A. Macdonald, who had been chosen prime minister by the Governor General when Canada was created, remained prime minister.

July 20, 1872

Sir John A. Macdonald

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Conservatives Win Second Majority

In the federal election, the Conservatives won a majority with 103 seats to the Liberals' 97; Sir John A. Macdonald remained prime minister.

November 07, 1873

Alexander Mackenzie

Elections and Prime Ministers 

First Liberal Prime Minister

Alexander Mackenzie became Canada's first Liberal prime minister.

January 22, 1874

Alexander Mackenzie

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberals Win First Majority

In the federal election, the Liberals formed their first majority, winning 133 seats. Alexander Mackenzie became the first Liberal prime minister.

May 26, 1874

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Secret Ballot Introduced

An Act was passed introducing vote by secret ballot, simultaneous elections and the abolition of property qualifications for Members of Parliament.

February 23, 1875

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Secret Ballot in Québec

A new electoral law was instated in Québec, enforcing the secret ballot for the first time.

January 22, 1878

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Secret Ballot Employed

The secret ballot and simultaneous voting were employed for the first time in Canada.

September 17, 1878

Sir John A. Macdonald

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Conservatives Regain Power

In the federal election, the Conservatives regained power with 137 seats to the Liberals' 69. Sir John A. Macdonald became prime minister again.

October 17, 1878

Macdonald Campaign Poster

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Macdonald Becomes Prime Minister for the Second Time

Conservative leader Sir John A. Macdonald defeated Liberal leader Alexander Mackenzie and became prime minister of Canada for the second time.

June 20, 1882

Sir John A. Macdonald, Canada's First Prime Minister

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Conservatives Retain Power 1882

In the federal election, the Conservatives retained power, winning 139 seats to the Liberals' 71. Macdonald remained prime minister.

February 22, 1887

Sir John A. Macdonald, Canada's First Prime Minister

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Conservatives Retain Power 1887

In the federal election, the Conservatives retained power with a reduced majority, winning 123 seats to the Liberals' 92. Sir John A. Macdonald remained prime minister.

March 05, 1891

Sir John A. Macdonald, Canada's First Prime Minister

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Conservatives Retain Power 1891

In the federal election, the results were identical to those of 1887, with 123 Conservative seats and 92 Liberal. Sir John A. Macdonald won his last election and remained prime minister.

June 06, 1891

Funeral of Sir John A. Macdonald at Cataraqui Cemetery.

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Death of Sir John A. Macdonald

Sir John A. Macdonald died in Ottawa at the age of 76. Thousands of grieving Canadians viewed his casket on display in the Senate.

June 16, 1891

Abbott, Sir John Joseph Caldwell

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Abbott Chosen Leader

John Joseph Caldwell Abbott was chosen to succeed Macdonald as leader of the Conservatives and became prime minister.

November 25, 1892

Thompson, Sir John Sparrow David

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Thompson Becomes PM

John Sparrow David Thompson succeeded J.J.C. Abbott as prime minister.

December 21, 1894

Sir Mackenzie Bowell

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Bowell Becomes PM

Following the death of J.S.D. Thompson on December 12, Mackenzie Bowell became prime minister.

May 01, 1896

Sir Charles Tupper

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Tupper Becomes PM

Sir Charles Tupper became prime minister, succeeding Mackenzie Bowell.

November 07, 1900

Sir Wilfrid Laurier Campaigning

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberals Hold Power 1900

In the federal election, the Liberals were sustained in power, with 132 seats to the Conservatives' 81. Laurier remained prime minister.

March 09, 1901

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Japanese Right to Vote

Naturalized Japanese won the right to vote in their successful appeal of the BC Elections Act.

November 03, 1904

Sir Wilfrid Laurier Campaigning

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberals Retain Power 1904

In a federal election, the Liberals maintained power, with 139 seats to the Conservatives' 75. Laurier remained prime minister.

October 26, 1908

Sir Wilfrid Laurier Campaigning

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberals Retain Power 1908

In a federal election, the Liberals remained in power with 133 seats to the Conservatives' 75. Laurier remained prime minister.

October 11, 1911

Sir Robert Borden

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Borden Becomes Prime Minister

Robert Borden became prime minister, ending Laurier's 15-year rule.

December 17, 1917

Sir Robert Borden

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Unionists Win Election

In a general election, a Unionist coalition of Conservatives and Liberals won 153 seats to the Liberals' 82. Borden remained prime minister.

January 24, 1918

Elections and Prime Ministers 

First Woman Elected to BC legislature

Mary Ellen Smith was the first woman elected to the BC legislature; it was the first election in which women could vote in BC.

October 20, 1919

Drury, Ernest Charles

Elections and Prime Ministers 

United Farmers of Ontario

In an Ontario general election, the Conservative government was defeated by the United Farmers of Ontario, led by E.C. Drury, who became premier.

July 10, 1920

Meighen, Arthur

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Arthur Meighen Becomes PM

Robert Borden resigned and was succeeded as Conservative prime minister by Arthur Meighen.

July 18, 1921

United Farmers of Alberta

Elections and Prime Ministers 

United Farmers of Alberta Win

The United Farmers of Alberta won the provincial election, forming the government until 1935. They chose Herbert Greenfield as premier.

December 06, 1921

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberals Win Minority

In a federal election, the Liberals won a minority government with 116 seats. The Conservatives took 50, the Progressives 65 (there were 4 other members). Mackenzie King became prime minister.

December 29, 1921

Elections and Prime Ministers 

King Becomes Prime Minister

W.L. Mackenzie King became prime minister of Canada for the first time.

October 29, 1925

William Lyon Mackenzie King, politician and prime minister

Elections and Prime Ministers 

King Hangs on to Minority

In a federal election the Conservatives won a plurality of seats with 116, but King managed to hold onto power. The Liberals took 99 and the Progressives 24, and there were 6 other members.

June 25, 1926

Elections and Prime Ministers 

King-Byng Affair

Mackenzie King's Liberals were defeated on a motion of censure. Governor General Byng refused to grant King's request to dissolve Parliament. Byng asked Arthur Meighen to form a government, which he did, on June 29.

July 02, 1926

Meighen, Arthur

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Meighen Nonconfidence

The Meighen government was defeated in a nonconfidence motion.

September 14, 1926

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

Elections and Prime Ministers 

King Forms Minority

In a federal election the Liberals and Conservatives reversed fortunes with the Liberals winning 116 seats and the Conservatives 91. The Progressives won 13 seats and the UFA 11; there were 14 others. King became prime minister again, forming a minority.

September 25, 1926

Elections and Prime Ministers 

King Prime Minister Again

Mackenzie King became prime minister again.

October 10, 1927

Elections and Prime Ministers 

R.B. Bennett Becomes Leader

Richard Bedford Bennett succeeded Arthur Meighen as Conservative Party leader at a convention held in Winnipeg.

July 18, 1928

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Conservatives Win BC Election

After 12 years of Liberal rule in BC, the Conservatives under Simon Tolmie took 35 of the province's 48 seats. Tolmie remained premier until November 1933.

July 28, 1930

Richard Bedford Bennett, politician

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Conservatives Win Election

In a federal election, the Conservatives won a majority with 137 seats to the Liberals' 91. The UFA held 10 and the Progressives dropped to 2. R.B. Bennett became prime minister.

August 07, 1930

Elections and Prime Ministers 

R.B. Bennett Becomes PM

R.B. Bennett was sworn in as prime minister.

June 19, 1934

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberals Win in Saskatchewan

The Liberals under James Garfield Gardiner won the Saskatchewan elections.

October 14, 1935

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberals Win Election

In the federal election, the Liberals won a landslide majority, with 171 seats to the Conservatives' 39. The CCF won 7 seats and the Social Credit 17. King became prime minister for the third time.

October 23, 1935

Elections and Prime Ministers 

King Sworn in as Prime Minister

Mackenzie King was sworn in as prime minister of Canada again.

October 25, 1939

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberals Win Québec Election

The Liberals won the Québec provincial elections. Joseph-Adélard Godbout was sworn in as premier on 8 Nov.

March 26, 1940

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberals Win Federal Election

In the federal election, the Liberals retained power with 178 seats. The Conservatives stayed at 39, the CCF won 8 and the Social Credit 10. King remained prime minister.

August 04, 1943

George Drew, politician

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Conservatives Win Ontario

George Drew's Progressive Conservative Party won the Ontario election, beginning a political dynasty that would last 42 years.

June 11, 1945

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberals Win Reduced Majority

In the federal election, the Liberals won with a reduced majority of 125 seats to the Conservatives' 67. The CCF rose to 28 seats. King remained prime minister.

January 08, 1948

Elections and Prime Ministers 

King Sets Record for Longevity

With 7825 days in office, Mackenzie King set a record for being prime minister longer than any other government leader in the British Commonwealth.

November 15, 1948

Elections and Prime Ministers 

King Resigns

W.L. Mackenzie King resigned as prime minister. He was succeeded by Louis St. Laurent the same day.

November 15, 1948

Louis St-Laurent, politician

Elections and Prime Ministers 

St-Laurent Becomes Prime Minister

Louis St-Laurent succeeded Mackenzie King as Liberal leader and became Canada's 12th prime minister.

June 27, 1949

Louis St-Laurent, politician

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberals Win Landslide

In the federal election, the Liberals won a landslide with 190 seats (the highest by any party to that time) to only 41 seats for the Progressive Conservatives under George Drew. The CCF won 13 and the Social Credit 10. Louis St-Laurent remained PM.

August 10, 1953

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberals Retain Power

In the federal election, the Liberals won 171 seats, the Progressive Conservatives 51, the CCF 23 and the Social Credit 15. St. Laurent remained prime minister.

October 30, 1956

Stanfield, Robert

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Conservatives Win Nova Scotia

The Conservatives under Robert Lorne Stanfield won the Nova Scotia election.

June 10, 1957

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Conservatives Win Minority

In a federal election, the Progressive Conservatives won a minority government, with 112 seats. The Liberals retained 105, the CCF 25 and the Social Credit 19. John G. Diefenbaker became the first prime minister from western Canada on June 21.

June 21, 1957

Diefenbaker, John

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Diefenbaker Sworn In

John Diefenbaker was sworn in as prime minister.

March 31, 1958

Diefenbaker, John

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Conservatives Win Majority

In a federal election, the Progressive Conservatives won a resounding majority, with 208 seats (the highest to that time). The Liberals dropped to only 49 seats and the CCF to 8. Diefenbaker remained prime minister.

June 18, 1962

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Conservatives Win Minority

In a federal election, the Conservatives were reduced to a minority government, dropping to 116 seats. The Liberals won 99, Social Credit 30 and the NDP 19 seats. Diefenbaker remained prime minister with the support of the Social Credit.

April 08, 1963

John Diefenbaker

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberals Win a Minority

In a federal election, the Liberals regained power, but after a vigorous campaign by Diefenbaker their 129 seats were only good for a minority government. The Conservatives held 95 seats, Social Credit 24 seats and the NDP 17. Lester Pearson became PM.

April 22, 1963

Pearson, Lester Bowles

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Pearson Sworn In

Lester Pearson was sworn in as prime minister.

April 22, 1964

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberals Win in Saskatchewan

The Liberals under W. Ross Thatcher won the Saskatchewan provincial election, displacing the CCF-NDP after 20 years.

November 08, 1965

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberals Keep Minority

In a general election, the Liberals gained only 2 seats to total 131 seats and maintain a minority government. The Conservatives won 97, the NDP 21, Social Credit 5, Ralliement des créditistes 9, and independents 2. Pearson remained prime minister.

April 20, 1968

Pierre Trudeau

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Trudeau Sworn In

Pierre Trudeau was sworn in as Canada's 15th prime minister.

June 25, 1968

Pierre Trudeau

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Trudeaumania Wins Majority

In a federal election in which Liberal leader Pierre Trudeau's popularity reached "Trudeamania," the Liberals won 155 seats and a majority. The Progressive Conservatives won 72 seats, the NDP 22, and the Créditistes 14, with one independent.

April 29, 1970

Bourassa, Robert

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberals Win Québec

The Liberal Party led by Robert Bourassa won the Québec provincial election.

August 30, 1971

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Conservatives Win Alberta

Peter Lougheed's Conservatives ended 36 years of Socred government in Alberta by winning a majority government in a general election.

October 30, 1972

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberals Win Minority

In a federal election, the Liberals lost their majority, winning only 109 seats to the Tories' 107, but Trudeau remained prime minister at the head of a minority government with the support of the NDP (31 seats). The Social Credit won 15 seats.

October 29, 1973

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Québec Liberals Win

Robert Bourassa's Parti libéral was re-elected with 30% of the vote.

July 08, 1974

Pierre Trudeau

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberals Regain Majority

In a federal election, the Liberals won back their majority with 141 seats to the Conservatives' 95. The NDP dropped to 16 and the Social Credit to 11. Trudeau remained prime minister.

August 01, 1974

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Election Expenses Act Passed

The Election Expenses Act came into force. The law provided for income-tax deductions, for disclosure of the source and amount of donations over $100, and limited the amount of money that could be spent in an election campaign.

September 11, 1975

Elections and Prime Ministers 

John Turner Resigns

Future Liberal prime minister John Turner resigned as federal finance minister to return to private life.

May 22, 1979

Clark, Joseph

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Conservatives Form Minority

In a federal election the Conservatives fell short of a majority, winning 136 seats to the Liberals' 114. The NDP won 26 seats and the Social Credit 6. The Conservatives formed a minority government with Joe Clark as PM.

June 04, 1979

Clark, Joseph

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Joe Clark Sworn In

Joe Clark was sworn in as the youngest prime minister ever.

February 18, 1980

Pierre Trudeau

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberals Return to Power

In a federal election, the Liberals returned to power, winning 147 seats to the Conservatives' 103. The NDP won 32. Trudeau became prime minister again.

March 03, 1980

Pierre Trudeau

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Trudeau Sworn In Again

Pierre Elliott Trudeau was sworn in again as prime minister.

April 26, 1982

Devine, Grant

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Conservatives Win Saskatchewan

Grant Devine's PC's won the general election in Saskatchewan.

June 30, 1984

Turner, John

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Turner Sworn In

Liberal leader John Turner was sworn in as Canada's 17th prime minister.

September 04, 1984

Brian Mulroney

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Conservatives Win Huge Majority

In a federal election, the Conservatives won 211 seats, eclipsing Diefenbaker's record 208. The Liberals under John Turner retained only 40, the NDP 30. Brian Mulroney became prime minister.

September 17, 1984

Brian Mulroney

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Brian Mulroney Sworn In

Brian Mulroney was sworn in as prime minister.

December 02, 1985

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberals Win Québec

Robert Bourassa led the Liberals to a sweeping victory over the Parti Québécois but failed to win his own seat until January 20, 1986.

May 08, 1986

Getty, Donald R.

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Getty's Majority Reduced

In a worsening economic climate, Premier Don Getty of Alberta saw the Conservative majority reduced from 75 of 79 seats to 61.

October 22, 1986

Copper Tools

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Social Credit Takes BC

William Vander Zalm led the Social Credit Party to an overwhelming victory in the BC election.

November 21, 1988

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Conservatives Regain Power

The Free Trade Agreement became the central issue in the 1988 federal election, and the Conservatives overcame a resurgent Liberal Party around whom opposition to the FTA coalesced.

September 06, 1990

Elections and Prime Ministers 

NDP Captures Ontario

The New Democrats took 74 of 130 seats in Ontario's provincial election, making leader Bob Rae the first NDP premier in Ontario's history.

June 25, 1993

Kim Campbell

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Kim Campbell Becomes First Female PM

After Prime Minister Brian Mulroney resigned from politics, Kim Campbell was selected as the leader of the Progressive Conservative Party and became Canada’s first female prime minister.

October 25, 1993

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberals Win Federal Election

In a federal election, the Liberals won 178 seats and a majority. The Conservatives' 154 seats were reduced to 2, while the NDP retained only 9. Reform won 52 seats and the Bloc Québécois became the official opposition with 54.

November 04, 1993

Jean ChrЋtien, politcian

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Chrétien Sworn In

Liberal leader Jean Chrétien was sworn in as Canada's 20th prime minister.

February 13, 1995

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberals Win By-elections

The Liberals won 2 federal by-elections in Québec.

March 25, 1996

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberals Win By-elections

The federal Liberal Party won 5 by-elections and the Bloc Québécois 1, restoring the Liberals to 177 seats and confirming the BQ as the official opposition.

November 18, 1996

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Conservatives Win PEI

The Conservative Party was elected in PEI. Patrick Binns, a former bean farmer, became premier.

June 02, 1997

ChrЋtien, Jean 1997

Elections and Prime Ministers 

1997 Federal Election Results

The Liberal Party retained its majority with 155 seats and the Reform Party with 60 seats became the Official Opposition. The Bloc Québécois fell to 44 seats from 54 while the NDP won 21 seats (up from 9) and the Conservatives 20 (up from 2).

June 07, 1999

Bernard Lord

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Conservatives Win in NB

The New Brunswick Progressive Conservative Party won a surprising landslide victory in the provincial election. Thirty-three-year-old Bernard Lord became premier.

November 27, 2000

Jean ChrЋtien, politcian

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberals Win Third Straight

The Liberal Party won its third straight federal election, increasing the number of seats from 161 to 172. Reform elected 66, The Bloc 38, NDP 13 and Conservatives 12. Chrétien was the first PM since King to win 3 straight elections.

November 14, 2003

Paul Martin

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Martin Becomes Liberal Leader

Paul Martin Jr. succeeded Jean Chrétien as Liberal leader, winning the leadership by a large majority (95%).

December 12, 2003

Paul Martin

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Martin Sworn In

Liberal Party leader Paul Martin was sworn in as Canada's 21st prime minister, leading a minority government.

January 23, 2006

Harper, Stephen

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Conservatives Win Federal Election

The Conservative Party of Canada, led by Stephen Harper, defeated the Liberal Party in a federal election, by a margin of 21 seats, ending 13 years of Liberal rule.

February 06, 2006

Swearing-In Ceremony

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Harper Sworn In

Conservative leader Stephen Harper became Canada''s 22nd Prime Minister.

December 02, 2006

Dion, StЋphane

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Dion Becomes Liberal Leader

The Liberal Party of Canada announced Stéphane Dion as the party's new leader, replacing outgoing Paul Martin and defeating front runner Michael Ignatieff.

March 26, 2007

Charest, Jean

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Quebec Liberals Win Election

Jean Charest''s Liberal Party won the provincial election and formed the first minority government in Québec in 130 years. The ADQ unseated the Parti Québécois as the official opposition, and for the first time in 30 years the PQ formed neither the government nor the opposition.

October 14, 2008

Harper, Stephen

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Conservatives Win Second Minority

The Conservative government, led by Prime Minister Stephen Harper, won a second minority government.

November 14, 2008

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Aariak Becomes First Female Premier of Nunavut

Eva Aariak, the MLA for Iqaluit East and Nunavut's former languages commissioner, defeated Paul Okalik to become Nunavut’s second premier and the territory’s first female premier. She was, however, the only woman in the legislature.

December 08, 2008

Charest, Jean

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Québec Liberals Win Majority

Jean Charest''s Liberal party won a majority in Québec, making him the first Québec premier since Maurice Duplessis to win three successive mandates in the province.

May 02, 2009

Michael Ignatieff, politician

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Ignatieff Becomes Leader

Interim leader Michael Ignatieff became the official leader of the Liberal Party during the party's leadership convention in Vancouver, BC. He had been appointed acting leader on 10 Dec 2008, replacing Stéphane Dion.

May 12, 2009

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberals Win in BC

Premier Gordon Campbell led the Liberal Party to a third consecutive majority, the first premier in 25 years to do so.

April 14, 2013

Justin Trudeau

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Trudeau Wins Liberal Leadership

Justin Trudeau won 80 per cent of the vote to become the leader of the federal Liberal Party, a position his father, Pierre, held for 16 years.

October 19, 2015

Notice of Federal Election

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberal Majority Ends Nine-Year Tory Rule

At the end of an 11-week campaign — one of the longest in Canadian history — voters elected a majority Liberal government under Justin Trudeau, denying Stephen Harper's Conservatives a fourth federal mandate. The 2015 election marked the end of Harper's nine-year term as prime minister, and following the results he resigned as leader of the Conservative Party.

November 04, 2015

Justin Trudeau

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Justin Trudeau Sworn In as Prime Minister

Justin Trudeau was sworn in as the 23rd prime minister of Canada at a ceremony in Ottawa, followed by the swearing-in of the country's first gender-balanced Cabinet of 15 men and 15 women. Trudeau's Liberal Party was elected to a majority government in the October 2015 federal election, ending nine years of Conservative government under Prime Minister Stephen Harper.

November 04, 2015

Elections and Prime Ministers 

First Gender-Balanced Federal Cabinet

Newly elected prime minister Justin Trudeau appointed 15 women to his 30-member Cabinet the first time in Canadian history that a federal Cabinet included an equal number of men and women.

November 30, 2015

Liberal Party, logo

Elections and Prime Ministers 

Liberal Victory in Newfoundland and Labrador

Liberal candidate Dwight Ball was elected premier of Newfoundland and Labrador in the province's 20th general provincial election. The Liberals won by a landslide, taking 31 of the province's 40 seats. The Conservatives, who had governed for the preceding 12 years, won seven seats and the NDP took two.