Browse "Parks & Nature Reserves"

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Arctic Exploration

Arctic exploration began in the Elizabethan era when English seamen sought a shortcut to the Spice Islands of the Far East by the seas north of America — the so-called Northwest Passage.

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Aulavik National Park

Centred on the wide Thomsen River valley on Banks Island, Aulavik National Park (set aside 1992, 12 200 km2) has an Inuvialuktun name that means "where people travel." The name was suggested by one of the elders of Sachs Harbour, the only community on the island.

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Auyuittuq National Park

Located on the Cumberland Peninsula of Baffin Island, Nunavut, Auyuittuq National Park (established 2001, 19 089 km2) was Canada's first national park located north of the Arctic Circle. It was first set up as a national park reserve in 1976 and established as a national park through the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement.

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Cape Scott Provincial Park

Cape Scott Provincial Park (established 1973, 50 km2), on the northwest tip of VANCOUVER I, BC, includes 64 km of coast with 23 km of sandy beaches interspersed by rocky headlands. The land rises inland to Mount St Patrick (415 m), and in it lies a 44 ha body of freshwater, Eric Lake.

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Cedar Dunes Provincial Park

Tucked into the westernmost corner of Prince Edward Island, Cedar Dunes Provincial Park (established 1962, 37 ha) has been developed around an historic lighthouse. Known as West Point, the site is the result of centuries of accretion of sand from a north to south coastal current.

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City Parks

The period of intense park building (1880-1914) was stimulated by an interplay of 4 factors. The first was a belief that the city dweller's increasing separation from nature caused physical, mental and moral distress. Parks were seen as healing antidotes to this urban malaise.

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Fundy National Park

Fundy National Park (established 1948, 205.9 km2), renowned for its high tides averaging 9 m, stretches for 13 km along the Bay of Fundy and extends inland where wooded hills are cut by deep valleys and tumbling streams.