Search for "New France"

Displaying 101-120 of 320 results
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Alexandria

Alexandria, ON, population centre, population 2,845 (2016 census), 2,924 (2011 census). Incorporated as a town in 1903, Alexandria lost this status in 1998 as the result of municipal restructuring in Ontario. It is now part of the new township of North Glengarry (population 10,109). Alexandria is located midway on the Canadian National Railway line between Montreal and Ottawa.

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Wallaceburg

Wallaceburg, Ontario, population centre, population 10,098 (2016 census), 10,127 (2011 census). Wallaceburg is a community located on the Sydenham River. Formerly a town (incorporated 1896), in 1998 Wallaceburg became a part of the new municipality of Chatham-Kent.

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Truro

Truro, Nova Scotia, incorporated as a town in 1875, population 12,261 (2016 census), 12,059 (2011 census). The Town of Truro is located along the Salmon River 100 km northeast of Halifax on Cobequid Bay, Minas Basin. The town derives its name from New England settlers and likely honours Truro in Cornwall, England.

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Uxbridge

Uxbridge, Ontario, incorporated as a township in 1974, population 21,176 (2016 census), 20,623 (2011 census). The township of Uxbridge is located 68 km northeast of Toronto on Highway 47. The town of Uxbridge was amalgamated in 1974 with the townships of Scott and Uxbridge to form a new township in the Regional Municipality of Durham.

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Nova Scotia and Confederation

Nova Scotia was one of the four founding provinces of Canada. It joined New Brunswick,  Ontario and Quebec in Confederation on 1 July 1867. However, this was mainly because Confederation delivered the Intercolonial Railway to the Maritimes, and because of the efforts of Sir Charles Tupper. His government passed approval for Confederation in the colonial legislature despite popular opposition. (See Confederation’s Opponents.) Confederation was met with mass protests in the colony. Joseph Howe led a two-year effort to repeal the union. (See Repeal Movement.) But Howe finally decided he could do more to help his province by working inside the federal government. He joined the federal Cabinet in 1869.

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Hartland

Hartland, NB, incorporated as a town in 1918, population 947 (2011c), 947 (2006c). The Town of Hartland is located at the mouth of Becaguimec Stream, 124 km upriver from Fredericton on the SAINT JOHN RIVER.

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Montreal

Montreal, Quebec, incorporated as a city in 1832, population 1,704,694 (2016 c), 1,649,519 (2011 c). Montreal is Canada’s second largest city and is home to nearly half of the province of Quebec’s population. It is the metropolis of the province and was the most populous city in Canada for a century and a half. It is located in southwestern Quebec on Île de Montreal at the confluence of the St. Lawrence and Ottawa rivers. Montreal is a major industrial centre, commercial and financial metropolis, railway and maritime bridgehead, and one of the centres of francophone culture in North America. It is one of the world's great cities and enjoys international acclaim.

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Ottawa

Ottawa, Ontario, incorporated as a city in 1855, population 934,243 (2016 c), 883,391 (2011 c). The City of Ottawa is the capital of Canada and is located on the Ottawa River on Ontario's eastern boundary with Québec, about 200 km west of Montréal. The name "Ottawa" is thought to derive from an Algonquian-speaking First Nation of the same name, probably from a word meaning "to trade" (see Odawa). Amalgamation, on 1 January 2001, merged "old" Ottawa with 11 area municipalities and the Regional Municipality of Ottawa-Carleton to create a “new” city. The amalgamated city encompasses the municipalities of Ottawa, Vanier, Nepean, Kanata, Gloucester and Cumberland; the townships of Rideau, West Carleton, Goulbourn and Osgoode; and the village of Rockcliffe Park.

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Dominion of Canada

Dominion of Canada is the country’s formal title, though it is rarely used. It was first applied to Canada at Confederation in 1867. It was also used in the formal titles of other countries in the British Commonwealth. Government institutions in Canada effectively stopped using the word Dominion by the early 1960s. The last hold-over was the term Dominion Day, which was officially changed to Canada Day in 1982. Today, the word Dominion is seldom used in either private or government circles.

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Stettler

Stettler, Alta, incorporated as a town in 1906, population 5748 (2011c), 5445 (2006c). The Town of Stettler, the county seat for County of Stettler, is located on the rolling prairie of south-central Alberta 203 km southeast of Edmonton on a creek flowing north to the Battle River.

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Bowmanville

Bowmanville, Ontario, population centre, population 39,371 (2016 census), 35,168 (2011 census). Bowmanville is located 25 km east of Toronto on Highway 401. Originally called Darlington Mills, it was renamed in the 1830s after Charles Bowman, the principal landowner. Bowmanville was incorporated as a village in 1852 and as a town in 1857. In January 1974, Bowmanville became part of the town of Newcastle (now Clarington) in the new Regional Municipality of Durham. Home of diverse manufacturers in the 19th century, Bowmanville now serves as a dormitory for Toronto and Oshawa.

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Gimli

Gimli, Manitoba, rural municipality, population 6,181 (2016 census), 5,845 (2011 census). Gimli was incorporated as a town from 1947 to 2003 after which it was reunited into the Rural Municipality of Gimli. (The original rural municipality was incorporated in 1887 and the village of Gimli separated from it in 1908.) The community is located on the west shore of Lake Winnipeg, 76 km north of Winnipeg.

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Thompson

Thompson, Manitoba, incorporated as a city in 1970, population 12 829 (2011c), 13 446 (2006c). The City of Thompson is located on the south side of the Burntwood River, 740 km north of Winnipeg.

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Minto

Minto, NB, incorporated as a village in1962, population 2505 (2011c), 2681 (2006c). It is located 56 km north of Fredericton in the Minto coalfields.

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Flin Flon

Flin Flon, Manitoba and Saskatchewan, incorporated as a city in 1970, population 4,982 in Manitoba, 203 in Saskatchewan (2016 census); 5,405 in Manitoba, 229 in Saskatchewan (2011 census); area 13.87 km2 in Manitoba, 2.37 km2 in Saskatchewan. The city of Flin Flon is situated along the Manitoba-Saskatchewan border, 743 km northwest of Winnipeg. The Saskatchewan part of Flin Flon is jointly administered by the two provinces. Flin Flon is named after the fictional character Professor Josiah Flintabbatey Flonatin (created by J.E.P. Muddock), the adventurer-explorer hero of The Sunless City (1905).

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Martensville

Martensville, Sask, incorporated as a town in 1969 and a city in 2009, population 7716 (2011c), 4978 (2006c). The City of Martensville is located 9 km north of SASKATOON. In the late 1960s as Saskatoon's population underwent

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Port Coquitlam

Port Coquitlam, BC, incorporated as a city in 1913, population 56 342 (2011c), 52 687 (2006c). The City of Port Coquitlam is located on the Pitt and Fraser rivers, 27 km east of VANCOUVER, of which it is a satellite. It is bounded on the north and west by the City of COQUITLAM.

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Prince George

Prince George, British Columbia, incorporated as a city in 1915, population 74,003 (2016 census), 71,974 (2011 census). Prince George is the largest city in the northern part of the province. It is situated in the geographical centre of British Columbia at the junction of the Nechako and Fraser rivers. Prince George was founded on the traditional territory of the Lheidli T'enneh, a sub-group of the Dakelh or Carrier Dene. The Dakelh aided Alexander Mackenzie on his journey to the Pacific coast in 1793.

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