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Red River

The Red River (880 km long) begins at the confluence of the Bois de Sioux and Otter Tail rivers at the border between Minnesota and North Dakota. It then flows north through southern Manitoba and into Lake Winnipeg. The last 175 km of the Red River, the portion located in Manitoba, is designated as a Canadian Heritage River due to its cultural and historical value. The Red River flows through a productive agricultural region that is prone to both drought and severe flooding — the largest flood in the area in recent history, coined “the flood of the century,” occurred in 1997. The river’s basin was once the bottom of a glacial lake, Lake Agassiz, which covered the region 8,000 years ago. Currently, the Red River provides water for municipal, industrial and agricultural uses, and offers numerous summer and winter recreational opportunities, including boating, fishing (including ice fishing), camping and skating.

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Restigouche River

Restigouche River (Ristigouche in Québec), 200 km long, rises in the highlands of northwestern New Brunswick as the Little Main Restigouche River.

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Red Deer River

The Red Deer River (740 km, mean annual flow rate 62 m3/s), is glacier-fed by streams from Mount Drummond and Cyclone Mountain in the Rockies of Banff National Park in Alberta. It flows east then south to join the South SASKATCHEWAN RIVER just inside Saskatchewan.

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St. Lawrence River

St. Lawrence River, grand river and estuary, which together with the Great Lakes forms a hydrographic system that penetrates 3,058 km into North America.

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St Croix River

St Croix River, 121 km long, rises in the Chiputneticook Lakes and flows SE to Passamaquoddy Bay, forming part of the border between NB and Maine. It was discovered (1604) by the French, and de MONTS built the first settlement in Acadia on Ile Sainte-Croix (now St Croix I) near the river's mouth.

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St Marys River (Ont)

The obvious strategic value of the river was well known to the Indigenous people before Étienne Brûlé travelled the river in 1622. Samuel de Champlain included the falls on his 1632 map.

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Saskatchewan River

The Saskatchewan River is 1,939 km long from the Rocky Mountains headwaters to Cedar Lake in central Manitoba. When including its longest tributary, the South Saskatchewan River, the Saskatchewan River is the fourth-longest river in Canada. It’s a major tributary to the Nelson River, ultimately draining into Hudson Bay. Its name is derived from the Cree word kisiskâciwanisîpiy meaning swift-flowing river. The Saskatchewan River was a major transportation route for First Nations for thousands of years and was an instrumental transportation and resource corridor during the fur trade and early European exploration.

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Rivière de Rupert

Rivière de Rupert is 763 km long to the head of Lac Témiscamie. It drains Lac Mistassini and then follows a twisted course through a series of lakes and across a flat coastal plain to discharge into southeastern James Bay.

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St Clair River

St Clair River, 64 km long, flows in a southerly direction, connecting Lake HURON in the N with Lake ST CLAIR in the S, and forms the international boundary between Canada and the US. Its northern portion has an average width of 0.8 km and depth of 8-18 m.

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Rivière Romaine

Rivière Romaine, 496 km long with a 14 350 km2 basin, rises (elev 760 m) in the Québec-Labrador lacustrine plateau, 45 km southwest of the CHURCHILL RIVER, and forms part of the Québec-Labrador boundary north of the 52nd parallel.

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Souris River

Souris River, about 720 km long, rises in the Yellow Grass marshes N of Weyburn, Sask, flows SE past Estevan and wanders S across the N Dakota border before entering Manitoba.

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South Nahanni River

South Nahanni River, 563 km long, flows southeast out of the Ragged Range of the Selwyn Mountains, cuts across successive spines of the Mackenzie Mountains and empties into the Liard River.

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Vermilion River

Vermilion River, 70 km (from its headstream to its confluence with the Kootenay R), rises in the Continental Ranges on the BC-Alberta border at the N end of KOOTENAY NATIONAL PARK. Fed by Tokumm Cr, it drains in a southerly direction, eventually emptying into the Kootenay R.

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Thompson River

Thompson River, 489 km long, rises in the Cariboo district of the Rocky Mountains and flows south as the North Thompson River.

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Bloodvein River

Named, perhaps, for the red granite stripes running through the bedrock near its source, the Bloodvein River begins in the vast wilderness of the Canadian Shield, 600 km northwest of Thunder Bay, Ont, and 500 km northeast of Winnipeg.

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Shelburne River

One of the last wilderness rivers in Nova Scotia, the Shelburne River begins in the Tobeatic Wilderness Area, the largest remaining wilderness in the Maritimes.

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Seal River

Named for the harbour seals (normally marine creatures) that are found up to 200 km upstream from Hudson Bay, Manitoba's Seal River is formed by the confluence of the North Seal (about 200 km long) and the South Seal (about 240 km long) rivers at Shethanei Lake.