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Displaying 421-440 of 548 results
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Sarah Burke

Sarah Burke, freestyle skier (born 3 September 1982 in Barrie, ON; died 19 January 2012 in Salt Lake City, Utah).

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Pat Quinn

​John Brian Patrick (Pat) Quinn, OC, OBC, hockey player, coach, manager (born 29 January 1943 in Hamilton, ON; died 23 November 2014 in Vancouver, BC).

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Šťastný Brothers

The Šťastný brothers — Marián, Peter and Anton — were a trio of star hockey forwards from Czechoslovakia. In the early 1980s they defected to Canada to play with the Québec Nordiques, and became one of the most exciting and successful scoring lines in National Hockey League history.

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Michael Edgson

​Michael Edgson, swimmer (born 6 May 1969 in North Vancouver, BC). Edgson won 20 medals at the Paralympic Games from 1984 to 1992, and 10 gold medals at the World Swimming Championships for the Physically Disabled.

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Harry Howell

Henry (Harry) Vernon Howell, hockey player, coach, manager, scout (born 28 December 1932 in HamiltonON; died 10 March 2019 in Ancaster, ON). Harry Howell was a defenceman in the National Hockey League (NHL). He played for the New York Rangers, Oakland Seals, California Golden Seals and Los Angeles Kings. Known affectionately as “Harry the Horse,” he set a franchise record with the Rangers for most games played with 1,160. He was also a seven-time all-star and a Norris Trophy winner. Following the end of his playing career, he served as a coach, manager or scout for several teams, including Team Canada (1978 world championships), the Edmonton Oilers and the New York Rangers. Howell was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1979. His No. 3 was retired by the Rangers in 2009.

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Eugenie Bouchard

Eugenie Bouchard, tennis player (born 25 February 1994 in Montréal, QC). At Wimbledon 2014, Bouchard became the first Canadian singles player to reach the final of a senior Grand Slam singles tennis tournament. Although she lost to Petra Kvitova, the match was watched by over a million Canadians and helped make Bouchard a media sensation. Two years earlier, Bouchard had won the Wimbledon 2012 girls’ tournament, becoming the first Canadian to win a Grand Slam singles title at any level. A two-time winner of the Bobbie Rosenfeld Award (2013 and 2014), she was the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) Newcomer of the Year in 2013 and won a WTA title in Nuremberg, Germany, in 2014.

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Larry Walker

Larry Kenneth Robert Walker, baseball player, coach (born 1 December 1966 in Maple Ridge, BC). Larry Walker is arguably the greatest Canadian position player in Major League Baseball (MLB) history. He and pitcher Ferguson Jenkins are the only Canadian players to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. A five-time all-star, Walker won seven Gold Gloves, three Silver Sluggers and the 1997 National League MVP award. He hit more than .300 in nine seasons, led the Major Leagues in batting average three times and was the first Canadian-born player to win a batting title since Tip O’Neill in 1887. Walker leads all Canadian MLB players in hits, home runs, RBI, doubles and runs scored. He won the Lou Marsh Trophy as Canada’s athlete of the year in 1998 and received the Tip O’Neill Award as Canada’s best baseball player nine times — more than any other player. He has also been inducted into the BC Sports Hall of Fame, the Colorado Sports Hall of Fame, Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame and the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame.

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Christie Blatchford

Christie Blatchford, journalist, newspaper columnist, writer, broadcaster (born 20 May 1951 in Rouyn-Noranda, QC; died 12 February 2020 in Toronto, ON). Christie Blatchford was one of Canada’s best-known journalists. In a career spanning five decades, she wrote for all of Canada’s national daily newspapers — the Globe and Mail, the Toronto Star and the National Post — as well as the Toronto Sun. She also published several books, including Fifteen Days: Stories of Bravery, Friendship, Life and Death from Inside the New Canadian Army (2008), which won the Governor General’s Literary Award for Non-Fiction. Blatchford won a National Newspaper Award for her columns in 1999 and was inducted into the Canadian News Hall of Fame in November 2019. She was a conservative writer who focused mainly on crime, human suffering and criminal justice. Her often controversial views prompted strong reactions and media responses.

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Reggie Leach

Reginald Joseph Leach, hockey player (born 23 April 1950 in WinnipegMB). Known as the “Riverton Rifle,” Ojibwe winger Reggie Leach is considered one of the premier goal scorers of the 1970s and one of the best Indigenous players in National Hockey League (NHL) history. As a member of the Philadelphia Flyers, Leach won the Stanley Cup in 1975. In 1976, he won the league goal-scoring title with 61 goals, adding another 19 in the post-season en route to winning the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP. Leach is the only non-goaltender to earn that distinction as a member of the Stanley Cup-losing team. Leach played 934 regular season NHL games, scoring 381 goals and 285 assists. He shares all-time league records for most goals scored in a single playoff game (5) and most goals scored in a single post-season (19). He is a member of the Manitoba Hockey Hall of Fame, the Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame, the Philadelphia Flyers Hall of Fame and the Order of Manitoba.

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Henri Richard

Henri Richard, hockey player (born 29 February 1936 in Montreal, QC; died 6 March 2020 in Laval, QC). The younger brother of Joseph-Henri-Maurice "Rocket" Richard, Henri Richard played with the Montreal Canadiens from 1955 to 75. The nickname “Pocket Rocket,” which he thoroughly disliked, compared him to his famous brother at the start of his career, but gradually he earned his own reputation, becoming one of the best all-round players in the NHL. Slighter in build than his older brother, Henri had his own unique style of play completely different from Maurice’s, and he became well known for his exceptional stick handling and playmaking abilities.

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Vic Vogel

Victor Stefan Vogel, pianist, conductor, composer, arranger, trombonist (born 3 August 1935 in Montreal, QC; died 16 September 2019 in Montreal). Vic Vogel was an icon of Montreal’s jazz scene. He emerged in the 1960s as a musician of considerable influence, bluster and colour. He moved freely between jazz, pop and, occasionally, symphony. He served as music director or accompanist for many CBC TV variety shows and was heard regularly on CBC Radio. He wrote or arranged music for ceremonies at Montreal’s Man and His World in 1968, the 1976 Olympic Summer Games in Montreal, the Canada Games in 1985, and the Grey Cup half-time shows in 1981 and 1985. He also performed at 35 editions of the Montreal International Jazz Festival — more than any other artist.