Search for "New France"

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Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec

The Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec in Quebec City houses the world’s most extensive collection of Québécois art, ranging from the paintings of such 19th-century masters as James Wilson Morrice and Cornelius Krieghoff to contemporary artists such as the Quebec City-based collective BGL. It also holds collections of early, modern and contemporary Canadian art, including an extensive collection of Inuit art. Since it opened in 1933, the Musée has designed, organized and hosted hundreds of exhibitions. Expanded in 1991 and again in 2016, the four-pavilion complex includes numerous exhibition galleries and workshops, an auditorium and a sculpture garden. The Musée also plays a role in the community through its library, educational service, and photographic documentation centre.

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Canadian Broadcasting Centre

The Canadian Broadcasting Centre was developed as the result of a proposal call process in which the Cadillac Fairview Corporation Limited was selected to develop the 9.3 acre site, owned by the CBC, and build the centre, which was then leased to the CBC on a long-term basis.

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Roy Thomson Hall

Roy Thomson Hall. 2,630-seat Toronto concert hall, located in the block bounded by King, Simcoe and Wellington streets. It is managed by The Corporation of Massey Hall and Roy Thomson Hall and is home to the Toronto Symphony Orchestra (TSO) and the Toronto Mendelssohn Choir.

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Shaftesbury Hall

Shaftesbury Hall. The auditorium in Toronto's first YMCA, built at Queen and James streets in 1872 to designs by the architects Smith and Gemmel. The hall was on the ground floor with a direct entrance from the street, a double gallery, and a seating capacity of about 1700.

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Empress Hotel

The Empress Hotel is a luxury waterfront hotel and national historic site in Victoria, British Columbia. Designed primarily by architect Francis M. Rattenbury, it is noted for its picturesque Château-style design and decadent interiors. It opened in 1908 and was built by the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) as part of its network of hotels, which also includes the Banff Springs Hotel, Chateau Lake Louise and Le Château Frontenac. Now officially known as the Fairmont Empress, the hotel, along with its afternoon tea, is arguably Victoria’s most popular tourist attraction.

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Father Lacombe Chapel

Father Lacombe Chapel, located in St. Albert, is generally considered to be the oldest surviving building in Alberta. The chapel was built in 1861 by Father Albert Lacombe, an Oblate of Mary Immaculate missionary. In the early 1860s Father Lacombe became concerned with the future of the Métis.

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Banff Springs Hotel

The hotel was developed as part of the CPR’s (Canadian Pacific Railway) network of hotels, which built landmark hotels in young cities across Canada in order to encourage the use of its transcontinental lines. The Banff Springs Hotel is in the lineage of hotels such as the Chateau Lake Louise in Alberta, Le Chateau Frontenac in Québec City and the Empress Hotel in Victoria, British Columbia. Known as the “Castle in the Rockies,” the Banff Springs Hotel is predominantly in the Scottish Baronial style, featuring an Arts-and-Crafts interior.

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The Carlu

The Carlu (Eaton Auditorium 1931-76). Concert hall and special events facility located on the top (seventh) floor of the former Eaton's College Street store in Toronto.

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St Lawrence Hall

In 1967, as a Toronto centennial project, the building was restored, and the auditorium came into use again for social functions and chamber music concerts.The building also houses the administrative offices and rehearsal rooms of the National Ballet of Canada.