Search for ""

Displaying 101-115 of 115 results
Article

Crab Apple

Crab apple (genus Malus) is a deciduous tree that differs from the orchard apple in bearing smaller, often acidic or astringent fruits.

Article

Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration (PFRA)

The Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration (PFRA) was a branch of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada with a focus on Western Canada. It was headquartered in Regina, Saskatchewan. The PFRA also had 22 district offices throughout the Prairie provinces. The agency began in response to the drought crisis of the 1930s in the Prairies. However, for nearly eight decades, it continued to help farmers conserve soil, prevent erosion, develop water resources and manage pasture land.

Article

Lentil

Lentil is a small leguminous seed belonging to the Lens culinaris species and the legume (Fabaceae) family.

Article

Cherry

Cherry is the common name for certain members of genus Prunus of the rose family, which produce small, fleshy, single-stoned fruits.

Article

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts (Brassica oleracea, Gemmifera group), are a biennial vegetable of the Cruciferae family. They are native to western Europe.

Article

Green Bean

There are at least six classes of green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), and many cultivars (commercial varieties) are available within each class. Common types include the "snap" bean (green or wax) and kidney beans.

Article

Potato

The potato (Solanum tuberosum) is a herbaceous annual of the nightshade family, which produces tubers at the end of underground branches called stolons.

Article

Asparagus

Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) is a perennial vegetable of the Lily family. Of Eurasian origin, asparagus was grown for food and medicinal purposes over 2000 years ago.

Article

Beet

Beet (Beta vulgaris), biennial herbaceous plant of the Chenopodiaceae family. There are 4 cultivated varieties: red or vegetable beet, fodder beet (mangel-wurzel), chard and sugar beet.

Article

Field Corn

Field corn (Zea mays) is a spring-sown annual belonging to the grass family (Gramineae). Native to North America, Indian corn, or maize, has diverged so radically from its ancestral species that these forerunners cannot be identified with certainty.

Article

Wild Berries in Canada

Over 200 species of small, fleshy, wild fruits occur in Canada. Most people consider them all “berries” but, technically, they are classed in different categories. These categories include drupes (e.g. cherries, elderberries), pomes (e.g. saskatoon berries), true berries (e.g. gooseberries, blueberries) and aggregate fruits (e.g. raspberries, strawberries). In this article “berry” is used in its less technical sense. The following are favourite Canadian wild berries.

Article

Agriculture in Canada

Agriculture is the practice of growing crops and rearing animals mainly for food. Farmers also produce other items such as wool from sheep and CBD oil from hemp plants.

In Canada, agriculture is an important industry. Only about 7 per cent of Canada’s land can be farmed. Other marginal (poorer) land can be used to ranch cattle. Aquaculture operations are found on the East and West Coasts and in the Great Lakes. Some crops such as tomatoes, cannabis and flowers are grown in greenhouses in urban centres. Canadian agriculture faces many challenges. Some of these challenges concern crop protection, soil conservation, labour, climate change and health.

Click here for definitions of key terms used in this article.

Article

Commodities in Canada

In commerce, commodities are interchangeable goods or services. Many natural resources in Canada are viewed as commodities. They are a major source of the country’s wealth. Examples of commodities include a barrel of crude oil, an ounce of gold, or a contract to clear snow during the winter. Commodity products often supply the production of other goods or services. Many are widely traded in futures exchanges (see Commodity Trading).