Search for "New France"

Displaying 21-40 of 319 results
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Montmagny

Jacques CARTIER passed Montmagny and its many offshore islands in 1535 and noted its beautiful surroundings. In 1646 a seigneury containing the area was granted to Huault, although permanent European habitation did not begin until the 1670s.

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Charny

Charny's development is linked to the railway. Near the end of the 19th century, the Grand Trunk Railway and the Intercolonial Railway set up west of l'Hêtrière, a parcel of the seigneury de Lauzon. This area was referred to as Chaudière Junction, or West Junction.

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New Brunswick and Confederation

New Brunswick became one of the founding members of the Dominion of Canada on 1 July 1867 when it joined Nova Scotia, Ontario and Quebec in Confederation. Arthur Hamilton Gordon, the lieutenant-governor of New Brunswick, helped organize the Charlottetown Conference (1–9 September 1864), where a federal union of British North American colonies was first discussed. By 1865, however, a majority in the New Brunswick legislature had swung against it. Albert Smith defeated pro-Confederation premier Samuel Tilley in a snap election that year. But the Fenian Raids in 1866 fueled New Brunswick’s sense of insecurity and increased support for Confederation. After Tilley’s party won another election in 1866, the legislature voted 38–1 in favour of Confederation.

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Dauphin

Pierre de LA VÉRENDRYE first visited the area in the 1730s and gave the name Dauphin, for the eldest son of the king of France, to a post in the area (1741).

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Saint-Quentin

Saint-Quentin, NB, incorporated as a town in 1992, population 2095 (2011c), 2250 (2006c). The Town of Saint-Quentin is located in northern New Brunswick in the Appalachian Highlands between the RESTIGOUCHE and MIRAMICHI rivers and tributaries of the SAINT JOHN RIVER.

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Saint-Benoît-du-Lac

  The community was founded by Dom Paul Vannier in 1912 when he acquired a farm at Point Gibraltar, a peninsula sloping down towards the lake. He and 3 other monks began farming and providing religious services.

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Verchères

   Verchères, Qué, Municipality, pop 5243 (2006c), 4782 (2001c), inc 1971. Verchères is 62 km northeast of Montréal, situated on the south shore of the St Lawrence River between LONGUEUIL and SOREL.

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Tadoussac

Tadoussac, Quebec, incorporated as a village in 1899, population 799 (2016 census), 813 (2011 census). Tadoussac is located at the confluence of the Saguenay and St. Lawrence rivers, 210 km northeast of Quebec City. In the Innu language, Totouskak means "breasts," a reference to the rounded hills found near the village.

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Salaberry-de-Valleyfield

Salaberry-de-Valleyfield draws its labour force from the local population and its history is marked by often violent labour disputes (see COMPANY TOWNS). Originally (1874) it was called Salaberry, in honour of Charles d'Irumberry de SALABERRY.

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Belledune

Belledune, NB, incorporated as a village in 1968, population 1548 (2011c), 1711 (2006c). The Village of Belledune was reincorporated in 1994 to include Jacquet River, Armstrong Brook, Archibald Settlement, Sunnyside, Becketville and Mitchell Settlement.

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Candiac

The Candiac Development Corporation (now Developpements urbain Candiac), a group of Canadian and European investors, owned utilized farmland in the parishes of Saint-Constant, Delson, Saint-Philippe and the town of LA PRAIRIE.

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Dalhousie

Dalhousie, NB, incorporated as a town in 1905, population 3512 (2011c), 3676 (2006c). The Town of Dalhousie, the shire town of Restigouche County (since 1837), is located on New Brunswick's north shore at the mouth of the Restigouche River.

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Caraquet

Caraquet, New Brunswick, incorporated as a town in 1961, population 4,248 (2016 census), 4,169 (2011 census). The town of Caraquet is located 68 km northeast of Bathurst. Its houses line the Baie de Caraquet, a rocky section of Chaleur Bay’s southern coast, offering magnificent views of the sea and the Gaspé Peninsula.

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Oromocto

Oromocto, New Brunswick, incorporated as a town in 1956, population 9,223 (2016 census), 8,932 (2011 census). The town of Oromocto is located at the junction of the Oromocto and Saint John rivers, 22 km southeast of Fredericton. The Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet) called the Oromocto River Wel-a-mook'-took (“deep water”) because of its good canoeing. The northeastern portion of the town bounds the Oromocto First Nation’s reserve, Oromocto No. 26.

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Verdun

Verdun is one of the province's oldest municipalities. It was founded in 1671 by Zacharie Dupuis, one of the first landholders on the Island of Montréal. He named Verdun after his native village of Saverdun in France.

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Rouyn-Noranda

For many years, Noranda was completely controlled and administered by Noranda Mines, formed in 1922 to exploit one of the richest copper and gold deposits ever found in Canada. The name "Noranda" is a combination of the words "North" and "Canada.

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Longueuil

In 1657, Charles LE MOYNE de Longueuil et de Châteauguay, a merchant of Ville-Marie (Montréal), was given an area of land situated along the St Lawrence River. He named it Longueuil, in honour of his mother's village in France.

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Moncton

Moncton, NB, incorporated as a city in 1890, population 71,889 (2016 census),69,074 (2011 census), is the largest city in New Brunswick. The City of Moncton is located in eastern New Brunswick on a bend of the Petitcodiac River. With a population of 144,810 (2016) the Greater Moncton region includes the steadily growing city of Dieppe and the town of Riverview.

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Sainte-Anne-des-Monts

In 1863 the area became known as the Parish of Sainte-Anne-des-Monts. The first settlers named it in memory of their native parish of Sainte-Anne-de-la-Pocatière in France. In 1968, it became the city of Sainte-Anne-des-Monts.

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Québec City

Québec City, Québec, founded in 1608, population 531,902 (2016 c), 516,576 (2011 c). Québec City, the capital of the province of Québec, is located on the north shore of the St. Lawrence River where it meets the Rivière Saint-Charles. Here, the St. Lawrence narrows to a width of just over 1 km, and navigation is made difficult by a group of islands, the largest of which is Île d'Orléans. Cap-Diamant, a promontory with an elevation of 98 m, dominates the site and was used effectively as a fortification, earning Québec City the name "Gibraltar of North America." The name "Québec" is probably derived from an Algonquian word meaning "narrowing of the river."