Search for "south asian canadians"

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Kingsville

Kingsville, Ont, incorporated as a town in 1901, population 21 362 (2011c), 20 908 (2006c). The Town of Kingsville amalgamated with the townships of Gosfield South and Gosfield North in 1998. Kingsville is located about 40 km southeast of WINDSOR, in Essex County on the north shore of Lake Erie.

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Rebellion in Upper Canada

The 1837 rebellion in Upper Canada was a less violent, more limited affair than the uprising earlier that year in Lower Canada. However, its leaders, including William Lyon Mackenzie, were equally serious in their demands. They wanted democratic reform and an end to the rule of a privileged oligarchy. The rebellion itself failed, but its very failure helped pave the way for moderate and careful political change in British North America. This included the union of Upper and Lower Canada into the Province of Canada and the eventual introduction of responsible government.

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Quebec Act, 1774

The Quebec Act received royal assent on 22 June 1774. It revoked the Royal Proclamation of 1763, which had aimed to assimilate the French-Canadian population under English rule. The Quebec Act was put into effect on 1 May 1775. It was passed to gain the loyalty of the French-speaking majority of the Province of Quebec. Based on recommendations from Governors James Murray and Guy Carleton, the Act guaranteed the freedom of worship and restored French property rights. However, the Act had dire consequences for Britain’s North American empire. Considered one of the five “Intolerable Acts” by the Thirteen American Colonies, the Quebec Act was one of the direct causes of the American Revolutionary War (1775–83). It was followed by the Constitutional Act in 1791.

This is the full-length entry about the Quebec Act of 1774. For a plain language summary, please see The Quebec Act, 1774 (Plain-Language Summary).

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Africville

Africville was an African-Canadian village located just north of Halifax and founded around the mid-19th century. The City of Halifax demolished the once-prosperous seaside community in the 1960s in what many said was an act of racism. The mayor of the Halifax Regional Municipality apologized for the action in 2010. For many people, Africville represents the oppression faced by Black Canadians, and the efforts to right historic wrongs.

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Medicine Hat

Medicine Hat, Alberta, incorporated as a city in 1906, population 63,260 (2016 census), 60,005 (2011 census). The city of Medicine Hat is one of Alberta's largest cities. It is located on the Canadian Pacific Railway main line and the Trans-Canada Highway in the southeastern corner of the province, bisected by the South Saskatchewan River. Canada's “sunniest” city, Medicine Hat averages 330 days of sunshine per year. A council of eight councillors and a mayor govern the city.

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Oak Bay

Oak Bay, incorporated as a district municipality in 1906, population 18 015 (2011c), 17 908 (2006c). The District of Oak Bay is located on the southeast corner of VANCOUVER ISLAND, adjoining the city of VICTORIA. It is surrounded by JUAN DE FUCA STRAIT on the south and Haro Strait on the east.

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Cobalt (Ont)

Cobalt, Ont, incorporated as a town in 1907, population 1133 (2011c), 1224 (2006c). The Town of Cobalt, located about 480 km north of Toronto near the Québec border and Lake Timiskaming, lies between the clay belt to the north around New Liskeard and the heavily forested area of Temagami to the south.

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Leduc

Leduc, Alta, incorporated as a town in 1906 and as a city in 1983, population 24 279 (2011c), 16 967 (2006c). The City of Leduc is located 30 km south of EDMONTON. Originally a telegraph terminus and stop on the Calgary and Edmonton Railway (1891), the community grew as an agricultural centre.

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Pintendre

Originally, Pintendre was part of the territory of Lévis. Agriculture was the mainstay of the population. Forestry also thrived. The name of the municipality most likely comes from the forests of "tender" (French, tendre), or supple, white pine (French, pin) that once covered the area.

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Outlook

The town of Outlook developed as a result of railway land development. In 1908 the Canadian Pacific Railway purchased the farm of a local homesteader and announced that it would be developed as a townsite.

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Lethbridge

Lethbridge, AB, incorporated as a city in 1906, population 92,729 (2016 census), 83,517 (2011 census). The City of Lethbridge is located 215 km southeast of Calgary. It overlooks the steep valley of the Oldman River.

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Swift Current

Swift Current began to adopt the persona of a community in 1883 with the appearance of a dam, water tank, freight sheds, roadhouse and dining room. For many years it has served a large ranching, mixed-farming and grain-farming area.

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St Thomas

  St Thomas, Ont, incorporated as a city in 1881, seat of Elgin County, population 37 905 (2011c), 36 110 (2006c). The City of St Thomas is located in southwestern Ontario, 29 km south of London. In 1803 Thomas TALBOT began to place settlers on a large tract of land he owned N of Lake Erie.

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Stony Plain

Stony Plain, Alta, incorporated as a town in 1908, population 15 051 (2011c), 12 363 (2006c). The Town of Stony Plain is located about 25 km west of EDMONTON. Settlement began in 1881 about 3 km south of the present town. This settlement was called Dogrump Creek but in 1892 was renamed Stony Plain.

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Fort St John

Fort St John, BC, incorporated as a city in 1975, population 18 609 (2011c), 17 402 (2006c). The City of Fort St John is located in northeastern British Columbia, about 459 km north of PRINCE GEORGE.

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Ladysmith

Ladysmith, BC, incorporated as a town in 1904, population 7921 (2011c), 7538 (2006c). The Town of Ladysmith is located on the east coast of VANCOUVER ISLAND, 85 km north of Victoria. It is located on Ladysmith Harbour on the northern edge of a lucrative farming area.

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Rebellion in Lower Canada (The Patriots' War)

In 1837 and 1838, French Canadian militants in Lower Canada took up arms against the British Crownin a pair of insurrections. The twin rebellions killed more than 300 people. They followed years of tensions between the colony’s anglophone minority and the growing, nationalistic aspirations of its francophonemajority. The rebels failed in their campaign against British rule. However, their revolt led to political reform, including the unified Province of Canada and the introduction of responsible government. The rebellion in Lower Canada, which is also known as the Patriots' War (la Guerre des patriotes), also gave French Canadians one of their first nationalist heroes in Louis-Joseph Papineau.