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Displaying 161-180 of 320 results
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St. Catharines

St. Catharines, ON, incorporated as a city in 1876, population 133,113 (2016 c), 131,400 (2011 c). The City of St. Catharines is the principal city of the Niagara Region. It lies south of Toronto across Lake Ontario (111 km by the Queen Elizabeth Way), 19 km inland from the international boundary with the United States, along the Niagara River. The city is named after Catharine Hamilton, wife of Robert Hamilton, an influential merchant of Queenston and a landowner with mills on Twelve Mile Creek; the growing community, then known as The Twelve or Shipman's Corners, was renamed in her honour after her death in 1796. After 1876, as the urban area of St. Catharines expanded, it was permitted to annex parts of the surrounding Grantham Township, culminating in 1961 in the complete amalgamation of the township as well as the adjacent towns of Merritton and Port Dalhousie. In 1970, the rural township of Louth to the west was split between St. Catharines and the new town of Lincoln.

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Haldimand County

Haldimand County, Ont, incorporated as a city in 2001, population 44 876 (2011c), 45 212 (2006c). The City of Haldimand County is situated on the north shore of LAKE ERIE along the GRAND RIVER, 20 km south of HAMILTON.

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Queens

Queens, NS, incorporated as a regional municipality in 1996, population 10 917 (2011c), 11 177 (2006c). The Region of Queens Municipality is located approximately 150 km southwest of Halifax.

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Canada East

In 1841, Britain united the colonies of Upper and Lower Canada into the Province of Canada. This was in response to the violent rebellions of 1837–38. The Durham Report (1839) laid out the guidelines to create the new colony with the Act of Union in 1840. The Province of Canada was made up of Canada West (formerly Upper Canada) and Canada East (formerly Lower Canada). The two regions were governed jointly until Confederation in 1867. Canada West then became Ontario and Canada East became Quebec.

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Charlottetown

Charlottetown, PEI, incorporated as a city in 1855, population 36,094 (2016 c), 34,562 (2011 c). The capital of Prince Edward Island, the City of Charlottetown is also the administrative centre of Queens County and the principal municipality of Canada's smallest province. It is situated on a broad harbour opening into the Northumberland Strait. Three rivers converge there, with the city located on a low-rising point of land between the Hillsborough (East) and North (Yorke) rivers just opposite the harbour's mouth. Suburban development has spread across the Hillsborough to Stratford, and between the North and West (Eliot) rivers at Cornwall. Besides its governmental functions, Charlottetown services a considerable agricultural hinterland and is the focus of Island communications. Its favourable climate, nearby beaches and claim to be the “Birthplace of Confederation” have made it a major tourist centre.

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Bas-Caraquet

Bas-Caraquet, NB, incorporated as a village in 1966, population 1380 (2011c), 1471 (2006c). The Village of Bas-Caraquet is located 7 km east of Caraquet.

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History of Settlement in the Canadian Prairies

The Canadian Prairies were peopled in six great waves of migration, spanning from prehistory to the present. The migration from Asia, about 13,300 years ago, produced an Indigenous population of 20,000 to 50,000 by about 1640. Between 1640 and 1840, several thousand European and Canadian fur traders arrived, followed by several hundred British immigrants. They created dozens of small outposts and a settlement in the Red River Colony, where the Métis became the largest part of the population. The third wave, from the 1840s to the 1890s, consisted mainly but not solely of Canadians of British heritage. The fourth and by far the largest wave was drawn from many nations, mostly European. It occurred from 1897 to 1929, with a pause (1914–22) during and after the First World War. The fifth wave, drawn from other Canadian provinces and from Europe and elsewhere, commenced in the late 1940s. It lasted through the 1960s. The sixth wave, beginning in the 1970s, drew especially upon peoples of the southern hemisphere. It has continued, with fluctuations, to the present. Throughout the last century, the region has also steadily lost residents, as a result of migration to other parts of Canada, to the United States, and elsewhere.

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Yarmouth

Yarmouth, NS, incorporated as a town in 1890, population 6761 (2011c), 7162 (2006c). The Town of Yarmouth is located at the entrance to Yarmouth Harbour at the western tip of Nova Scotia and referred to as Eastern Canada's Gateway.

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Klondike

Klondike (also spelled Klondyke). The name is derived from a Gwich'in word, thron-duick (hammer river), and identifies a town, a river, and a range of hills in the Yukon.

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Niagara-on-the-Lake

Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, incorporated as a town in 1792 and reincorporated in 1970, population 17,511 (2016 census), 15,400 (2011 census). The town of Niagara-on-the-Lake is located where the Niagara River enters Lake Ontario. In 1970, the old town of Niagara-on-the-Lake joined the Township of Niagara. The township included the villages of Virgil, Queenston, St. Davids, Homer and McNab. Together they became a regional town retaining the name Niagara-on-the-Lake.

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Lethbridge

Lethbridge, AB, incorporated as a city in 1906, population 92,729 (2016 census), 83,517 (2011 census). The City of Lethbridge is located 215 km southeast of Calgary. It overlooks the steep valley of the Oldman River.

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York

York, Ont, is an urban community within the city of TORONTO and is separated from Etobicoke by the Humber River.

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Gladstone

Gladstone, Manitoba, incorporated as a town in 1882, population 879 (2011c), 802 (2006c). The Town of Gladstone is located on the Whitemud River, 138 km northwest of Winnipeg and 30 km west of the southern tip of Lake Manitoba.

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Kitchener-Waterloo

The twin cities of Kitchener-Waterloo are located in central southwestern Ontario, 105 km southwest of Toronto. Each retains its own political culture within a common historical framework and with similar, but by no means identical, socio-economic developments. Kitchener (originally named Berlin), the larger of the two, was the county seat (1853), judicial and financial centre of Waterloo County from 1853 to 1973. It continues to have a predominant influence in the Regional Municipality of Waterloo, which was formed in 1973 by combining several communities and cities, including Kitchener, Waterloo and Cambridge.

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Olds

Olds, Alta, incorporated as a town in 1905, population 8235 (2011c), 7253 (2006c). The Town of Olds is situated in a transition zone between prairie grassland and partially wooded parkland 89 km north of Calgary.

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Cambridge

Cambridge, Ont, incorporated as a city in 1973, population 126 748 (2011c), 120 371 (2006c). The City of Cambridge, located along the GRAND RIVER, 55 km northwest of Hamilton near KITCHENER-WATERLOO.

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Ross River

Ross River, Yukon, Settlement population 352 (2011c), 313 (2006c). Ross River is located at the confluence of the Ross and Pelly rivers, and on the Canol Road (see CANOL PIPELINE) at the halfway point on the Campbell Highway. It

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Vanier

Too small for industry, the city was the location of a number of federal office buildings. The retail and service sectors were also important to the economy. A significant portion of the population remains French-speaking.

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Kemptville

Kemptville, Ont, urban area, population 3532 (2011c), 3539 (2006c). Kemptville is located on Kemptville Creek, a branch of the Rideau River, 64 km south of Ottawa.

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Cannington Manor

Cannington Manor, established 1882 when an Englishman, Capt Edward Michell Pierce, claimed 5 townships 65 km south of Whitewood, NWT (now in southeast Saskatchewan), the nearest point on the CPR.