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Elora

Elora, Ont, Unincorporated Place. Elora is a picturesque community located about 25 km northeast of Guelph at the junction of the Grand and Irvine rivers.

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Fort Edmonton

Fort Edmonton was established on the Northern Saskatchewan River in 1795 by the Hudson's Bay Company as a fortified trading post next to the rival North West Company, which had earlier built its own fort nearby.

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Crown Point

Crown Point is a large peninsula strategically commanding the narrow passage of the southwestern portion of Lake CHAMPLAIN in upper New York State. It was initially the site of Fort Saint-Frédéric, built by the French in 1731 to defend French territory from English colonial invasion.

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Cumberland Sound

Cumberland Sound is a major inlet, 300 km long, with an average width of 65 km, in the east coast of BAFFIN ISLAND. Its steep sides rise over 2125 m to glacier-covered uplands.

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Val-d'Or

The town was originally made up of 2 separate municipalities. The first, Bourlamaque, founded in 1934 by the Lamaque Mining Co, was a company town for many years. The other, Val-d'Or, was incorporated as a village in 1935 and a town 2 years later, and began as a bustling gold-rush town.

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Creston

Creston, BC, incorporated as a town in 1924, population 5306 (2011c), 4826 (2006c). The Town of Creston is located in the west Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia.

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Devon

Devon, Alta, incorporated as a village in 1949 and as a town in 1950, population 6510 (2011c), 6256 (2006c). The Town of Devon is located about 30 km southwest of Edmonton, high on the banks of the North Saskatchewan River.

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Devon Island

The Truelove Lowland area of the island has diverse vegetation and wildlife, an abundance of soil water in the summer owing to blocked drainage, and greater precipitation and higher summer temperatures (4° to 8°C), with more clear days than other parts of the island.

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Digby

Digby, NS, incorporated as a town in 1890, population 2152 (2011c), 2092 (2006c). The Town of Digby is located on the west side of the Annapolis Basin in western Nova Scotia.

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Dewdney Trail

The original Dewdney Trail was a 400 km trail route extending from Hope to Galbraith's Ferry on the Kootenay River. The trail was routed and constructed under the supervision of Edgar DEWDNEY, a civil engineer appointed by Frederick Seymour, the governor of the colony of BC, in April 1865.

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Cree Lake

Cree Lake, 1435 km2, elevation 487 m, max length 81 km, max width 57 km, located in northern Saskatchewan west of Reindeer Lake and S of Lake Athabasca, is the fourth-largest lake in Saskatchewan.

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Coppermine River

The Coppermine River, 845 km long, rises in the Barren Lands of the Northwest Territories in Lac de Gras and flows northwest through Point Lake to Coronation Gulf on the Arctic Ocean. The majority of its course lies in Nunavut.

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Continental Divides in Canada

A continental divide is a ridge or natural boundary of elevated terrain that separates the drainage basins of a continent. Each drainage basin contributes its water to river systems, which in turn flow into distinct larger bodies of water, such as oceans. The main continental divide in Canada follows the ridge of the Rocky Mountains.

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Cordillera

A cordillera is a major system of often parallel mountain ranges that includes the intervening plateaus, valleys and plains.

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Lake Diefenbaker

Lake Diefenbaker is a reservoir lake south of Saskatoon, Sask. It was formed by the construction of 2 dams that created a widening in the South SASKATCHEWAN RIVER as part of the South Saskatchewan River Development Project, inaugurated in 1958.

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Delta (Landform)

​A delta is a deposit of sediment at the mouth of a river that accumulates as the river flows into a standing body of water such as a lake or ocean. Because sediment tends to be rich in nutrients, deltas become fertile wetlands inhabited by diverse wildlife. Among the largest deltas in Canada are those of the Mackenzie and Saskatchewan rivers, as well as the Peace-Athabasca Delta (where the Peace, Athabasca and Birch rivers meet). Certain deltas offer advantageous access to natural resources and maritime transportation, but development projects are often controversial due to the ecological importance of these environments.

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Detroit River

The Detroit River, 52 km long, flows south from Lake ST CLAIR to the west end of Lake ERIE, forming part of the boundary between Ontario and Michigan. Detroit, Michigan, and WINDSOR, Ontario, dominate its shores. Part of the ST LAWRENCE SEAWAY, it is heavily used by commercial traffic.