Search for "Charlottetown Accord"

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Politics in Newfoundland and Labrador

The province of Newfoundland and Labrador has a minority Liberal government, elected on 16 May 2019. The premier of the province is Andrew Furey and the Lieutenant Governor is Judy May Foote. Its first premier, Joey Smallwood, was elected in 1949, after the province joined Confederation. Prior to Confederation, Newfoundland was first a British colony, then beginning in 1907, a dominion of the British Empire. It has been governed in various ways throughout its history, beginning with naval law in the 1600s.

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Charlottetown

Charlottetown, PEI, incorporated as a city in 1855, population 36,094 (2016 c), 34,562 (2011 c). The capital of Prince Edward Island, the City of Charlottetown is also the administrative centre of Queens County and the principal municipality of Canada's smallest province. It is situated on a broad harbour opening into the Northumberland Strait. Three rivers converge there, with the city located on a low-rising point of land between the Hillsborough (East) and North (Yorke) rivers just opposite the harbour's mouth. Suburban development has spread across the Hillsborough to Stratford, and between the North and West (Eliot) rivers at Cornwall. Besides its governmental functions, Charlottetown services a considerable agricultural hinterland and is the focus of Island communications. Its favourable climate, nearby beaches and claim to be the “Birthplace of Confederation” have made it a major tourist centre.

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Quebec

Quebec is the largest province in Canada. Its territory represents 15.5 per cent of the surface area of Canada and totals more than 1.5 million km2. Quebec shares borders with Ontario, New Brunswick and Newfoundland. The province also neighbours on four American states: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont and New York. The name Quebec was inspired by an Algonquian word meaning “where the river narrows.” The French in New France used it solely to refer to the city of Quebec. The British were the first to use the name in a broader sense.

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Music in Charlottetown

The capital of Canada's smallest province, Prince Edward Island. Established by 300 French colonists as Port-la-Joie in 1720, it was renamed Charlottetown in 1768 and was incorporated as a town in 1855 and as a city in 1875.

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Fort Amherst

Fort Amherst, on the west shore of Charlottetown Harbour, PEI, was built in late 1758 by the British. The site had been known previously as Port La Joie, established in 1720 as the capital of the French colony of Île Saint-Jean.

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Hillsborough River

The Hillsborough River begins near the white sand beaches of the north shore and winds 45 km through rich farm country to its mouth (Charlottetown Harbour) on the south shore of Prince Edward Island. At its mouth, the North and West rivers come together to meet the Hillsborough.

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New Brunswick

New Brunswick is one of three provinces collectively known as the "Maritimes." Joined to Nova Scotia by the narrow Chignecto Isthmus and separated from Prince Edward Island by the Northumberland Strait, New Brunswick forms the land bridge linking this region to continental North America. It is bounded in the north by Québec and in the west by the US (Maine). In 1784, the British divided Nova Scotia at the Chignecto Isthmus, naming the west and north portion New Brunswick after the German duchy of Brunswick-Lunenburg. New Brunswick is now the only officially bilingual province in Canada.

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Cornwall (PEI)

Cornwall, PEI, incorporated as a town in 1995, population 5162 (2011c), 4677 (2006c). The Town of Cornwall is located 6 kilometres west of CHARLOTTETOWN. Named after the Duchy of Cornwall in England, the community was originally

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Cardigan

Cardigan, PEI, incorporated as a village in 1954 and as a community in 1983, population 332 (2011c), 374 (2006c). The Community of Cardigan is situated 54 km northeast of CHARLOTTETOWN. A fishing and farming community and the

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Skinners Pond

Beginning in the 1940s, the fishermen have supplemented their incomes by raking IRISH MOSS from the harbour beaches, from which a gelatinous substance called carrageenin is extracted for use in pharmaceutical and certain food products.

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Kensington

Owing to its crossroads location, the town received a station when the PEI Railway was constructed in 1873. Today Kensington is still a commercial centre, although it competes with the larger port town of Summerside.

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Cavendish

 Established in 1790 by Scottish immigrants, Cavendish was originally a farming community. With the 1930s' establishment of the national park, TOURISM has become the community's principal employer. It was in Cavendish that novelist and native Lucy Maud MONTGOMERY wrote ANNE OF GREEN GABLES.

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Prince Edward Island

Prince Edward Island is Canada's smallest province, making up just 0.1 per cent of Canada’s total land area. It is situated in the Gulf of St Lawrence and separated from Nova Scotia and New Brunswick by the Northumberland Strait. PEI was known to its earliest settlers, the Mi’kmaq as Abegweit, meaning "cradle in the waves,” and was described by Jacques Cartier in 1534 as "the fairest land that may possibly be seen." PEI's deep red soil has always been its most striking feature and, together with the sea, the mainstay of the population since the early 18th century.

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Nova Scotia and Confederation

Nova Scotia was one of the four founding provinces of Canada. It joined New Brunswick,  Ontario and Quebec in Confederation on 1 July 1867. However, this was mainly because Confederation delivered the Intercolonial Railway to the Maritimes, and because of the efforts of Sir Charles Tupper. His government passed approval for Confederation in the colonial legislature despite popular opposition. (See Confederation’s Opponents.) Confederation was met with mass protests in the colony. Joseph Howe led a two-year effort to repeal the union. (See Repeal Movement.) But Howe finally decided he could do more to help his province by working inside the federal government. He joined the federal Cabinet in 1869.

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Northumberland Strait

A generally shallow depth causes strong tidal currents, water turbulence and a high concentration of suspended red silt and clay, which led early French colonists to name the strait "la mer rouge.