Search for "south asian canadians"

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La Pocatière

In 1672, François Pollet de La Combe-Pocatière received the seigneurie de la Grande-Anse as a gift from his father-in-law, Nicholas Juchereau de Saint-Denys. This territory became the parish of Ste-Anne-de-La-Pocatière, and later, the city of La Pocatière.

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Erickson

Swedish and Norwegian immigrants were among the first settlers in the region. They took up homesteads in the Otter Lake and Rolling River area on a reserve called Scandinavia or New Sweden, established in 1885 as part of a campaign to attract Scandinavian immigrants to Canada.

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La Prairie

In 1836 the first Canadian railway, linking La Prairie with Saint-Jean, was inaugurated. After construction of the Victoria Bridge, goods trains coming from the east were diverted from the town.

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Pitt Meadows

Pitt Meadows, BC, incorporated as a city in 2007, population 17 736 (2011c), 15 623 (2006c). The City of Pitt Meadows is an agricultural community located in the lower Fraser Valley east of VANCOUVER on the north side of the FRASER RIVER at its junction with the Pitt River.

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Old Montreal

Old Montreal is the historic district of the city of Montreal, located in the south-central part of Montreal Island and bounded by the St. Lawrence River to the south, Saint-Antoine Street to the north, McGill Street to the west and Saint-Hubert Street to the east. In the second half of the 20th century, this area came under pressure from urban change, as business and port activity shifted elsewhere, depriving Old Montreal of its historic roles. But in the 1960s, a long process began that completely transformed it into a heritage district (it was at this time that the name Old Montreal came into common use). The designation of the Arrondissement historique de Montréal by the Quebec government in 1964 marked an important step in this transformation. With massive investments from the three levels of government, as well as from businesses and individuals, a lengthy rehabilitation effort began. Nearly 60 years later, visitors can now follow the traces of Montreal’s history back to pre-colonial times, and the changes that the city has undergone since the first European settlers arrived in 1642.

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Northwest Passage

The Northwest Passage is a sea corridor through Canada's Arctic archipelago and along the northern coast of North America. European explorers searched in vain for the passage for 300 years, intent on finding a commercially viable western sea route between Europe and Asia.

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Montgomery's Tavern

Montgomery’s Tavern was a focal point in the Rebellion of Upper Canada in 1837. Owner John Montgomery sympathized with the Reform movement but not the actual rebellion. His tavern served as the headquarters for William Lyon Mackenzie — culminating in a skirmish there between local rebels and government militia. The location in Toronto today, at Yonge Street and Montgomery Avenue, is a national historic site.

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Saint-Augustin-de-Desmaures

The area was first settled in 1658, more than 20 years before the creation of the parish of Saint-Augustin-de-Desmaures. The name Saint-Augustin was supposedly given to the parish in honour of the governor of New France from 1663-1665, Augustin de Saffray de MÉZY.

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Davis Strait

Some of the greatest depths in the eastern Arctic are reached here (3660 m) in the southern end of the strait. The surface waters are strongly affected by counterclockwise-flowing currents.

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Lake Simcoe

Lake Simcoe, 744 km2, elevation 219 m, is situated in southern Ontario between Georgian Bay and Lake Ontario, 65 km north of Toronto. In the north, The Narrows divides it from Lake Couchiching at Orillia, and both lakes drain northwesterly via the Severn River to Georgian Bay.

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Wetaskiwin

Wetaskiwin, Alta, incorporated as a city in 1906, population 12 525 (2011c), 11 689 (2006c). The City of Wetaskiwin is one of Alberta’s oldest cities. It began (1891) as Siding 16 on the Calgary-Edmonton Railway and was a point of departure for early, predominantly Scandinavian homesteaders.

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Father Lacombe Chapel

Father Lacombe Chapel, located in St. Albert, is generally considered to be the oldest surviving building in Alberta. The chapel was built in 1861 by Father Albert Lacombe, an Oblate of Mary Immaculate missionary. In the early 1860s Father Lacombe became concerned with the future of the Métis.

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Fairview

Fairview, Alta, incorporated as a town in 1949, population 3162 (2011c), 3297 (2006c). The Town of Fairview is located in the Peace River country of northern Alberta, 110 km north of Grande Prairie.

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Arviat

Arviat, Nunavut, incorporated as a hamlet in 1977, population 2318 (2011c), 2060 (2006c). The Hamlet of Arviat is located on the west coast of Hudson Bay and is the southern-most community of mainland Nunavut.

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Clarence-Rockland

Clarence-Rockland, Ont, incorporated as a city in 1998, population 23 185 (2011c), 20 790 (2006c). The City of Clarence-Rockland is located on the OTTAWA RIVER 35 km east of OTTAWA.