Search for "south asian canadians"

Displaying 441-460 of 739 results
Article

St George's

St George's, NL, incorporated as a town in 1965, population 1207 (2011c), 1246 (2006c). The Town of St George's is located on the southeast side of St George's Bay, on the west coast of Newfoundland.

Article

Moosonee

Moosonee, Ont, incorporated as a town in 2001, population 1725 (2011c), 2006 (2006c). The Town of Moosonee is located on the Moose River, 25 km from James Bay.

Article

Huntsville

Huntsville, Ont, incorporated as a town in 1900, population 19 056 (2011c), 18 280 (2006c). The Town of Huntsville is located 215 km north of Toronto on a short section of the Muskoka River connecting Vernon and Fairy lakes.

Article

Torbay

Torbay, NL, incorporated as a town in 1972, population 7397 (2011c), 6281 (2006c). The Town of Torbay is located 10 km north of ST JOHN'S overlooking Torbay Bight.

Article

Farnham

During the first 40 years (1810-50), the chief source of revenue was the manufacture of potash. The construction of the Stanstead-Shefford & Chambly Railway in 1857 began Farnham's remarkable progress as a railway centre, thanks to its geographic position and competition among railway promoters.

Article

St Pierre-Jolys

St-Pierre-Jolys, Manitoba, incorporated as a village in 1947, population 1099 (2011c), 839 (2006c). The Village of St-Pierre-Jolys is located 56 km southeast of WINNIPEG near the Rat River.

Article

Coral Harbour

Coral Harbour, Nunavut, incorporated as a hamlet in 1972, population 891 (2016 census), 834 (2011 census). The hamlet of Coral Harbour is located at the head of South Bay on Southampton Island in Hudson Bay, 715 km southeast of Iqaluit. The name Coral Harbour is descriptive and refers to the fossilized coral in its harbour. The Inuit’s traditional name for the site and the island, Salliq, is also descriptive and means “flat island.”

Article

Geography of Quebec

The province of Quebec is composed of three of Canada’s sevenphysiographic regions. These regions are the St. Lawrence Lowlands, the Canadian Shield and the Appalachian region. The St. Lawrence Lowlands is the most fertile and developed region. The majority of the population of Quebec lives here, mainly between Montreal and Quebec City. The Canadian Shield covers most of Quebec from approximately 80 km north of the St. Lawrence River valley up to the Ungava region. It is a vast region composed of thousands of lakes and thousands of square kilometres of forested area. On the south bank of the St. Lawrence River, between the Richelieu River and the Gaspé Peninsula, is the Quebec part of the Appalachian mountain chain which extends from Gaspé south to Alabama.

Article

Upper Canada

Upper Canada was the predecessor of modern-day Ontario. It was created in 1791 by the division of the old Province of Quebec into Lower Canada in the east and Upper Canada in the west. Upper Canada was a wilderness society settled largely by Loyalists and land-hungry farmers moving north from the United States. Upper Canada endured the War of 1812 with America, William Lyon Mackenzie’s Rebellion of 1837, the colonial rule of the Family Compact and half a century of economic and political growing pains. With the Act of Union in 1841, it was renamed Canada West and merged with Lower Canada (Canada East) into the Province of Canada.

Article

Yoho National Park

Yoho National Park is a protected area located in the Rocky Mountains, in the southeast corner of British Columbia. The park was established in 1886, initially as the Mount Stephen reserve, making it (along with Glacier National Park, established the same day) the second oldest national park in Canada, following Banff. Spanning 1,313 km,2 the park features 28 mountain peaks above 3,000 metres. Yoho National Park is one of seven parks in the Rocky Mountains that make up the Canadian Rocky Mountains UNESCO World Heritage site (the others are Jasper, Banff and Kootenay national parks, and Mount Robson, Mount Assiniboine and Hamber provincial parks). Among the reasons for the UNESCO designation are the Burgess Shale sites, several of which are located in Yoho National Park, featuring fossils from 540 million years ago. The name Yoho comes from a Cree expression of awe and wonder.

Article

Music in Sarnia

Ontario city settled in 1807. It was known first as Fort Rapids, later as Port Sarnia, and in 1856 it was incorporated as the town of Sarnia. It became a city in 1914. Its population was 49,033 in 1986.

Article

Mont Sainte-Anne

Internationally known for its SKIING facilities, 7 World Cup races have been held there since 1969. The area is superbly equipped; downhill skiers and snowboarders enjoy 51 runs totalling 60 km (15 km are illuminated for night skiing).

Article

Laterrière

The name was first applied to the township (1850) and then the parish (1882). They were named after Marc-Pascal de Sales Laterrière, who represented Saguenay in the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada.

Article

Rogers Pass

During the summer of 1885 the railway was constructed over the pass at great expense. Over 6.4 km of snowsheds (31) were built to protect trains, trackage and workmen from AVALANCHES (the area receives up to 15 m of snow each winter).

Article

Cranbrook

Cranbrook, BC, incorporated as a city in 1905, population 19 319 (2011c), 18 329 (2006c). The City of Cranbrook lies near the western edge of the ROCKY MOUNTAIN TRENCH, in the Kootenay region, 845 km east of Vancouver.

Article

Kamloops

Kamloops, BC, incorporated as a city in 1893, population 90,280 (2016 census), 85,678 (2011 census). The City of Kamloops amalgamated with North Kamloops in 1967 and in 1973 with surrounding residential areas to form the present city of Kamloops. It is located in southern British Columbia 355 km northeast of Vancouver via the Coquihalla highway. The city is situated at the confluence of the North and South Thompson rivers near their entrance into Kamloops Lake. The Kamloops Reserve 1, home to some members of the Tk'emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation, is adjacent to the city, on the northeast corner of the river junction.

Article

Habitat 67

Habitat 67 is an experimental urban residential complex designed by Israeli-born architect Moshe Safdie and located in the Cité du Havre neighbourhood south of Montréal’s Old Port sector. Commissioned by the Canadian Corporation for Expo 67, the project derives its name from the theme of the fair, “Man and His World,” and became one of the major pavilions of the exhibition. It is the only remaining structure from Expo 67 to retain its original function. In 2015, the Guardian called Habitat “a functioning icon of 1960s utopianism, and one of that period’s most important buildings.”

Article

Georgina

Georgina, Ontario, incorporated as a town in 1986, population 45,418 (2016 census), 43,517 (2011 census). The townships of North Gwillimbury and Georgina were amalgamated in 1971 and incorporated as the town of Georgina in 1986. The town of Georgina includes the communities of Udora, Keswick, Sutton and Jackson’s Point. It is located on the south shore of Lake Simcoe, 67 km north of Toronto.