Search for "New France"

Displaying 41-60 of 863 results
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Chute Montmorency

Chute Montmorency, located 13 km east of Québec City at the mouth of Rivière Montmorency where it empties into the St Lawrence River, is the highest waterfall in the province of Québec and the eighth-highest in Canada.

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Government Building

Government has always been the most important patron of ARCHITECTURE in Canada, and this role has increased rapidly over the past few decades. As its duties and responsibilities expand, so do its building needs. Today all levels of government contribute to all aspects of our built environment.

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Thousand Islands

Thousand Islands (Ontario part), an 80 km long section of the St Lawrence River, extending downstream from Lake Ontario between Kingston and Brockville and containing over 1000 rocky, wooded islands which range from several square kilometres to barely emergent rocks and shoals.

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Crown Point

Crown Point is a large peninsula strategically commanding the narrow passage of the southwestern portion of Lake CHAMPLAIN in upper New York State. It was initially the site of Fort Saint-Frédéric, built by the French in 1731 to defend French territory from English colonial invasion.

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L'Orignal

L'Orignal, ON, population centre, population 1,450 (2016 census), 1,403 (2011 census). L'Orignal is located on the Ottawa River, 88 km east of Ottawa. In 1998, L’Orignal was amalgamated into the new township of Champlain. The town of Vankleek Hill and the former townships of West Hawkesbury and Longueuil were also part of the amalgamation. L’orignal is the French word for moose, and the town was named after nearby Pointe à l'Orignal.

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Dauphin

Pierre de LA VÉRENDRYE first visited the area in the 1730s and gave the name Dauphin, for the eldest son of the king of France, to a post in the area (1741).

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Music in New Westminster

City east of Vancouver near the mouth of the Fraser River. After its designation (1859, incorporation 1860) as the capital city of British Columbia it was named New Westminster by Queen Victoria, and hence nicknamed 'The Royal City.

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New Brunswick and Confederation

New Brunswick became one of the founding members of the Dominion of Canada on 1 July 1867 when it joined Nova Scotia, Ontario and Quebec in Confederation. Arthur Hamilton Gordon, the lieutenant-governor of New Brunswick, helped organize the Charlottetown Conference (1–9 September 1864), where a federal union of British North American colonies was first discussed. By 1865, however, a majority in the New Brunswick legislature had swung against it. Albert Smith defeated pro-Confederation premier Samuel Tilley in a snap election that year. But the Fenian Raids in 1866 fueled New Brunswick’s sense of insecurity and increased support for Confederation. After Tilley’s party won another election in 1866, the legislature voted 38–1 in favour of Confederation.

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Geography of New Brunswick

New Brunswick is part of the Appalachian region, one of Canada’s seven physiographic regions. The province’s principal geographic divisions are the watershed of the Bay of Fundy, centering on the Saint John River valley, and the north and east shores. The residents of the north and east shores live in coastal fishing villages and interior lumbering settlements along rivers. They are separated physically from the valley communities by uplands and belts of forest. They are also separated culturally by their predominantly French language and Catholic religion.

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St. Stephen

St. Stephen, New Brunswick, incorporated as a town in 1973, population 4,415 (2016 census), 4,817 (2011 census). The town of St. Stephen is located on the St. Croix River in southwestern New Brunswick. First incorporated as a town in 1871, in 1973 St. Stephen was amalgamated with nearby Milltown (incorporated 1878) to form St. Stephen-Milltown. The incorporated name of St. Stephen has been used since 1975.

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Montmagny

Jacques CARTIER passed Montmagny and its many offshore islands in 1535 and noted its beautiful surroundings. In 1646 a seigneury containing the area was granted to Huault, although permanent European habitation did not begin until the 1670s.

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Lake Champlain

Lake Champlain (or Lac Champlain), 1269 km2, lies mostly in the United States (New York and Vermont); only the northernmost tip lies in Canada. The lake is long (201 km) and narrow (0.8 to 23 km wide) and interspersed with numerous islands.