Search for "New France"

Displaying 41-60 of 836 results
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Acadia

Acadia is a land deeply imbued with history. Its present status is that of a minority, a "country" with vague outlines but a vigorous spirit. Its territorial origin follows the French colonial efforts in the early 17th century. The first permanent agricultural settlements in what is now Canada occurred there.

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St. Stephen

St. Stephen, New Brunswick, incorporated as a town in 1973, population 4,415 (2016 census), 4,817 (2011 census). The town of St. Stephen is located on the St. Croix River in southwestern New Brunswick. First incorporated as a town in 1871, in 1973 St. Stephen was amalgamated with nearby Milltown (incorporated 1878) to form St. Stephen-Milltown. The incorporated name of St. Stephen has been used since 1975.

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Montmagny

Jacques CARTIER passed Montmagny and its many offshore islands in 1535 and noted its beautiful surroundings. In 1646 a seigneury containing the area was granted to Huault, although permanent European habitation did not begin until the 1670s.

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Charny

Charny's development is linked to the railway. Near the end of the 19th century, the Grand Trunk Railway and the Intercolonial Railway set up west of l'Hêtrière, a parcel of the seigneury de Lauzon. This area was referred to as Chaudière Junction, or West Junction.

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Lake Champlain

Lake Champlain (or Lac Champlain), 1269 km2, lies mostly in the United States (New York and Vermont); only the northernmost tip lies in Canada. The lake is long (201 km) and narrow (0.8 to 23 km wide) and interspersed with numerous islands.

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Music in New Westminster

City east of Vancouver near the mouth of the Fraser River. After its designation (1859, incorporation 1860) as the capital city of British Columbia it was named New Westminster by Queen Victoria, and hence nicknamed 'The Royal City.

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New Brunswick and Confederation

New Brunswick became one of the founding members of the Dominion of Canada on 1 July 1867 when it joined Nova Scotia, Ontario and Quebec in Confederation. Arthur Hamilton Gordon, the lieutenant-governor of New Brunswick, helped organize the Charlottetown Conference (1–9 September 1864), where a federal union of British North American colonies was first discussed. By 1865, however, a majority in the New Brunswick legislature had swung against it. Albert Smith defeated pro-Confederation premier Samuel Tilley in a snap election that year. But the Fenian Raids in 1866 fueled New Brunswick’s sense of insecurity and increased support for Confederation. After Tilley’s party won another election in 1866, the legislature voted 38–1 in favour of Confederation.

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Miscou Island

Miscou Island, 64 km2, comprises the most eastern part of Gloucester County, New Brunswick, on the west side of the Gulf of St Lawrence and at the entrance to CHALEUR BAY.

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Dauphin

Pierre de LA VÉRENDRYE first visited the area in the 1730s and gave the name Dauphin, for the eldest son of the king of France, to a post in the area (1741).

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Saint-Quentin

Saint-Quentin, NB, incorporated as a town in 1992, population 2095 (2011c), 2250 (2006c). The Town of Saint-Quentin is located in northern New Brunswick in the Appalachian Highlands between the RESTIGOUCHE and MIRAMICHI rivers and tributaries of the SAINT JOHN RIVER.

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Montmorency

The Montmorency Manoir, built in 1781 by Frederick HALDIMAND, governor general in chief of Canada, was inhabited 1791-94 by the duke of Kent, father of Queen Victoria. First known as the "Kent House," it suffered a devastating fire in 1993 but was rebuilt by the following year.

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Saint-Benoît-du-Lac

  The community was founded by Dom Paul Vannier in 1912 when he acquired a farm at Point Gibraltar, a peninsula sloping down towards the lake. He and 3 other monks began farming and providing religious services.