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Lettuce

Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is an annual vegetable belonging to the Compositae family.

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Lynx

The lynx is a medium-sized, carnivorous mammal of family Felidae. Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) is distinguished from the North American bobcat by its tufted ears, large feet, long legs and lack of a white patch below the tail tip.

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Lady's Slipper

Lady's Slipper, common name for some members of the orchid family in which modified petals (labella) fold inward to make the toe of the "slipper."

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Leech

Leech (class Hirudinea) is a segmented annelid worm with 34 segments, many external rings and no setae (bristles).

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Damselfly

Damselfly, thin-bodied, carnivorous insect with 2 pairs of long, membranous, narrow-based wings.

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Kale

Kale (Brassica oleracea, Acephala Group), cole crop (like cabbage, cauliflower, etc), belonging to the Cruciferae family.

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Blue Mountains

The Blue Mountains (Montagnes Bleues) is a 240 km long group of high hills along the Canada and United States border in the Eastern Townships.

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Landslide

A landslide is a downward and outward movement of a soil mass that formed part of a slope.

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Lark

   Lark is a common name for small songbirds of the primarily Old World family Alaudidae.

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Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi (Brassica oleracea, Gongylodes Group), sometimes called stem turnip or cabbage turnip, an important Canadian garden vegetable of the Cruciferae family.

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Biogeography

Ecology is subdivided into 3 fields of study: autecology (relations of individual species or populations to their milieu), synecology (composition of living communities) and dynecology (processes of change in related communities).

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Climate

Climate is often defined as average weather, when weather means the current state of the atmosphere. For scientists, climates are the result of exchanges of heat and moisture at the Earth's surface. Because of its size, Canada has many different climates.

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Ash

Ash (Fraxinus), genus of trees or shrubs of olive family (Oleaceae). About 60 species occur worldwide, primarily in cold temperate regions; 4 are native to Canada.

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Marmot

The marmot is a large, diurnal, burrowing rodent of the squirrel family, native to Eurasia and North America.

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Melon

The melon (Cucumis melo), is an annual, viny plant of the Cucurbitaceae family. The most important cultivated groups are cantaloupe, muskmelon, winter melon and sugar melon.

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Limestone

Slaked lime is quicklime combined with water; this hydrated lime is then sized to meet customer specifications.

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Maple Trees in Canada

Maples are trees and shrubs in the genus Acer, previously classified within the maple family Aceraceae, but now placed by some taxonomists in Sapindaceae (Soapberry family), which also includes horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastaneum). There are approximately 150 species of maple around the world, most in the temperate zone of the Northern Hemisphere, and the majority native to eastern Asia. Ten maple species are native to Canada, perhaps the best known being sugar maple (Acer saccharum) of eastern Canada and the northeastern United States. The Canadian flag displays a stylized maple leaf, and maple is Canada’s official arboreal emblem. Maples are not only important to Canada symbolically, they are also ecologically and economically significant.

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Metamorphic Rock

Metamorphic rock is one of the 3 major classes of rock comprising the Earth's crust, the others being SEDIMENTARY and IGNEOUS ROCKS. Metamorphic rock has been transformed, while in the solid state, by pressure, temperature and deformation.

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Moss

The sporophyte produces spores that are wind dispersed. Some spores germinate into new gametophyte plants. Gametophyte plants produce sex cells (eggs, sperm) that undergo fertilization to produce another sporophyte.

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Midnight Sun

Midnight Sun In the Arctic in the summer, the sun shines all night long. Robert W. SERVICE had this in mind when he used the phrase in his ballad "The Cremation of Sam McGee" (1907). The expression "land of the