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Article

Judith Forst

Judith (Doris) Forst (b Lumb). Mezzo-soprano, teacher, b New Westminster, near Vancouver, 7 Nov 1943; B MUS (British Columbia) 1966, honorary LLD (British Columbia) 1991, honorary D MUS (Victoria) 1995.

Article

Jean Gascon

Jean Gascon, CC., actor, theatre and opera director (born 21 December 1921 in Montréal, QC; died 20 April 1988 in Stratford, ON).

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William Goodridge Roberts

By the early 1950s, he had national prominence through his participation in numerous Canadian and international exhibitions, and in 1952 was one of 4 artists in Canada's first official participation at the Venice Biennale. He became the first artist-in-residence at UNB in 1959.

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Gerald Potterton

Gerald Potterton, director, producer, animator (b at London, UK 8 Mar 1931). Gerald Potterton trained at the Hammersmith School of Art in London and served in the Royal Air Force.

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Gordon Delamont

Gordon Arthur Delamont, teacher, author, composer, trumpeter (born 27 October 1918 in Moose Jaw, SK; died 16 January 1981 in Toronto, ON). Gordon Delamont was a leading music educator and theorist, and a guiding figure in Canada in the third-stream movement — a synthesis of classical music and jazz.

Article

Paul Chamberland

Paul Chamberland, poet (b at Longueuil, Qué 16 May 1939). Chamberland was the most iconoclastic Québec poet of the 1960s and one of the most innovative essayists of the 1970s.

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Mort Sahl

Morton Sahl, standup comedian, actor (born at Montréal 11 May 1927). Mort Sahl, whose parents were American, was brought up in California. After high school he served in the air force before earning a degree in city management and engineering from the University of Southern California in 1953.

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Marc-André Hamelin

Marc-André Hamelin, pianist (b at Montréal 5 Sep 1961). After his training in Montréal, he studied in Philadelphia at Temple University with Harvey D. Wedeen and Russell Sherman.

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Celtic Languages

The Celtic languages belong to the family of languages known as Indo-European and as such are related to most of the languages of Europe and many others found as far east of Europe as India. Linguists recognize 2 main divisions of Celtic: Continental Celtic and Insular Celtic.

Article

Donn Kushner

Although he published one collection of short fiction for adults, The Witness and Other Stories (1981), he secured his literary reputation as a children's writer. In 1981 The Violin Maker's Gift won the Canadian Library Association Book of the Year Award.

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Robert Charbonneau

Robert Charbonneau, journalist, writer (b at Montréal 3 Feb 1911; d at St-Jovite, Qué 26 June 1967). Because of Charbonneau's work, French Canadian literature, particularly the novel, underwent a profound transformation.

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William Stevens

William (Jervis) Stevens, pianist, teacher (born 6 January 1921 in ​Montréal, ​QC, of American parents; died 1997). B.Mus. (McGill) 1943.

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Ruth Carse

Margaret Ruth Pringle Carse, dancer, choreographer, teacher, director (born at Edmonton, Alta 7 Dec 1916; died at Ponoka, Alta 14 Nov 1999). Carse was a pioneer of professional dance in Western Canada.

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Wilf Carter

Wilfred Arthur Charles Carter, Wilf, singer, songwriter (b at Port Hilford, NS 18 Dec 1904; d at Scottsdale, AZ, 5 Dec 1996). He left the Maritimes in the 1920s and reached Alberta, becoming a cowboy and part-time entertainer. In 1930 he made his radio debut in Calgary.

Article

Gordon Lightfoot

Gordon Meredith Lightfoot, CC, O.Ont, singer, songwriter, guitarist (born 17 November 1938 in Orillia, Ontario). Gordon Lightfoot is one of the most acclaimed and respected songwriters of the 20th century, and one of the most significant musicians Canada has produced. The country’s top male recording artist of the 1970s, Lightfoot first drew attention in the early 1960s when songs such as “Early Morning Rain” and “For Lovin’ Me” became hits for artists like Ian and Sylvia and Peter, Paul and Mary. Lightfoot achieved international prominence as a solo artist with a series of pop and country hits, including “If You Could Read My Mind,” “Sundown,” “Carefree Highway,” “Rainy Day People” and “The Wreck of The Edmund Fitzgerald.” Ian Tyson has said that nobody “before or since has had the impact on Canadian culture, through popular music or folk music, that Gordon Lightfoot has had.” Lightfoot’s gold- and platinum-certified albums have combined to sell more than 10 million copies worldwide. He has won 12 Juno Awards from 27 nominations, including Male Vocalist of the Year four times (1971–73, 1975) and Folksinger of the Year five times (1970, 1975–78). A Member of the Order of Ontario and a Companion of the Order of Canada, he has been inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame, Canada’s Walk of Fame, the Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame, the US Songwriters Hall of Fame, the Canadian Country Music Hall of Fame and Canadian Folk Music Walk of Fame, among many other honours.

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Tom Patterson

After an abortive first attempt to enlist Laurence Olivier as an artistic advisor, Patterson succeeded in arousing the interest of Tyrone GUTHRIE, who agreed to come to Canada to serve as the festival's first artistic director.