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Article

Leonard Ratzlaff

Leonard Ratzlaff. Bass-baritone, conductor, teacher, administrator, b Swalwell, Alta, 27 Jan 1949; B Church MUS (Mennonite Brethren Bible College) 1970, BA (University of Winnipeg) 1971, MA (University of Iowa) 1980, DMA (Iowa) 1985.

Article

Arthur Garami

Arthur Garami. Violinist, teacher, b Derecske, Hungary, 20 Nov 1921, naturalized Canadian 1955, d north of Montreal, 12 Jan 1979; performance diploma (Franz Liszt Academy, Budapest) 1942.

Article

John Goss

John Goss. Baritone, teacher, b London 10 May 1894, d Birmingham 13 Feb 1953. A pupil of Victor Beigel and Reinhold von Warlich in London, Goss first performed in Canada at the Vancouver Sea Festival (CPR Festivals) during a North American tour in 1929.

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Michael Conway Baker

He has been the recipient of 3 Genie Awards for best film score, a Juno for best classical composition, a Gemini for best score in a television series and an award for Outstanding Success in Film Music from PROCAN (now SOCAN), the Canadian performing rights society.

Article

Hugh Pickett

Hugh (Frank Digby) Pickett. Impresario, b Vancouver 11 Apr 1913, d Keriston, BC 13 Feb 2006. Pickett grew up in Vancouver, and first worked briefly in the Port Warden's Office, then for Dingwall Cotts Steamship Co until 1940, when he entered the Canadian Army.

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Don Cowan

Donovan Frankland Cowan, educator, composer (born 22 June 1919 in Outlook, Saskatchewan; died 12 January 2013 in Victoria, BC). B MUS (Saskatchewan) 1948, MA (Minnesota) 1962, ED D (Northern Colorado) 1971.

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Denis Potvin

Denis Charles Potvin, hockey player (b at Ottawa 29 Oct 1953). After a junior career with the Ottawa 67s, Potvin was the first player chosen in the 1973 NHL draft.

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Anna Weber

Anna Weber, folk painter, fraktur artist (b in Earl Twp, Lancaster County, Pa 3 June 1814; d in Woolwich Twp, Waterloo County, Ont 12 Oct 1888). Weber immigrated to UC in 1825 and, following the death of her parents, moved from one Mennonite family to another until her own death.

Article

Kevin Austin

Kevin Austin. Composer, teacher, b London 10 Jul 1948, naturalized Canadian 1984; B MUS composition (McGill) 1970, MMA composition (McGill) 1973. He studied composition and electroacoustics at McGill University with István Anhalt, Paul Pedersen, Alcides Lanza, and Bengt Hambraeus.

Article

Mireille Lagacé

Mireille Lagacé (nee Bégin), organist, harpsichordist, teacher (b at St-Jérôme, Qué, 8 Jun 1935). Lagacé studied in Montréal with Germaine Malépart (piano), Conrad Letendre (organ), and Gabriel Cusson (theory).

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Yolande Dulude

Yolande Dulude. Soprano, born Montreal 12 Jan 1931, died there 18 Aug 2003; lauréat (Basile-Moreau College) 1948. After studying piano for a number of years, she began voice study in 1944.

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Jane Fair

Jane Fair. Saxophonist, composer, teacher, b Guelph, Ont, 24 July 1948; BA (McGill) 1970. One of the first Canadian women to play jazz, Fair worked in dance bands in Barrie, Ont, before moving to Montreal in 1966 to study French literature at McGill University.

Article

Canuck

“Canuck” is a nickname for a Canadian — sometimes bearing a negative implication, more often wielded with pride. It goes back at least as far as the 1830s, and its meaning has changed over time. The word “Canuck” may be most familiar today as the name of a National Hockey League franchise, the Vancouver Canucks (see British Columbia). In the 20th century, the term enjoyed a much broader use.

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Jody Wilson-Raybould

Jody Wilson-Raybould (“Puglaas” or “woman born of noble people” or “woman with integrity” in Kwak’wala), politician, lawyer (born 23 March 1971 in Vancouver, BC). Jody Wilson-Raybould is the independent MP for Vancouver Granville. She was federal minister of justice, attorney general and minister of veterans affairs in the government of Liberal Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Prior to her career in federal politics, she was a BC crown prosecutor, regional chief of the Assembly of First Nations, and member of the BC Treaty Commission. As Canada’s first Indigenous justice minister, Wilson-Raybould introduced groundbreaking legislation, including Bill C-14 on medically assisted dying, C-16 on gender identity and human rights, and C-45, The Cannabis Act. She has helped to build bridges between First Nations communities and the Canadian government and is committed to helping Indigenous peoples seek self-government and gain equality in education, health care and legal rights.

Article

Indian Agents in Canada

Indian agents were the Canadian government’s representatives on First Nations reserves from the 1830s to the 1960s. Often working in isolated locations far from settler communities, Indian agents implemented government policy, enforced and administered the provisions of the Indian Act, and managed the day-to-day affairs of Status Indians. Today, the position of Indian agent no longer exists, as First Nations manage their own affairs through modern band councils or self-government.

Article

Douglas Jung

Douglas Jung, CM, OBC, politician, lawyer, soldier (born 25 February 1924 in Victoria, BC; died 4 January 2002 in Vancouver, BC). Douglas Jung was a member of Force 136, a group of Chinese Canadian soldiers who fought behind enemy lines in the Pacific theatre during the Second World War. After the war, Jung became a lawyer in British Columbia and was the first Chinese Canadian lawyer to appear before the BC Court of Appeal in 1955. On 10 June 1957, Douglas Jung was elected as the first Chinese Canadian member of Parliament.

Article

Jordin Tootoo

Jordin John Kudluk (Thunder) Tootoo, hockey player (born 2 February, 1983 in Churchill, MB). Jordin Tootoo is the first Inuk hockey player to play in the National Hockey League (NHL). Jordin got the attention of the NHL as a tough, talented right-winger in his junior hockey days in Manitoba. In 2003, he received national attention when he played for Team Canada at the World Junior Hockey Championship. After playing 13 seasons in the NHL, he retired in 2018. He is known for speaking to youth and maintaining his Inuit culture.

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Cowichan Sweater

The Cowichan sweater is a garment created in North America with a distinctly patterned design knitted out of bulky-weighted yarn. It originated during the late 19th century among the Cowichan, a Coast Salish people in British Columbia. Historically also called the Indian sweater or Siwash sweater (a derogatory Chinook word for Indigenous people), the Cowichan people reclaimed the name after the 1950s as a means of emphasizing their claim to the garment. The popularity of the sweater by the mid-1900s thrust Cowichan sweaters into the world of international fashion, where they have been appropriated by non-Indigenous designers. Nevertheless, several knitters from various Coast Salish communities around Vancouver Island and the mainland of British Columbia continue to create and sell authentic sweaters. In 2011, the Canadian government recognized Cowichan knitters and sweaters as nationally and historically significant.

Article

Mary Riter Hamilton

Mary Matilda Hamilton (née Riter), artist (born 7 September c. 1867 in Teeswater, ON; died 5 April 1954 in Coquitlam, BC). Mary Riter Hamilton was a painter who exhibited her works in Europe and across Canada. Shortly after the fighting stopped, Hamilton travelled to Europe to paint First World War battlefield landscapes before they were cleared (see War Artists). She produced over 350 works in three years, which are a document of the destruction and devastation caused by the war.