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Sonnet L'Abbé

Sonnet L'Abbé, poet, literary critic, teacher (born at Toronto, Ont, 24 September 1973). Sonnet L'Abbé's poetic themes of ethnicity and environmentalism display the influence of her father, a FRANCO-ONTARIAN potter, and mother, a Guyanese artist.

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Jeanne Corbin

Jeanne Henriette Corbin, communist activist and union organizer (born in March 1906 in Cellettes, France; died 7 May 1944 in London, Ontario). A member of the Communist Party of Canada and secretary of the Canadian Labour Defense League, she defended the rights of Canadian workers for over 15 years. She gained particular prominence for her role in the lumber workers’ strike in Rouyn, Quebec in 1933.

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Catherine MacLellan

Catherine Ruth MacLellan, singer, songwriter (born 23 April 1980 in Burlington, ON). Catherine MacLellan is a contemporary folk-roots singer-songwriter whose recordings have won multiple East Coast Music Awards, Canadian Folk Music Awards, Music PEI Awards and a Juno Award. She is the daughter of “Snowbird” composer Gene MacLellan.

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Princess Alice Countess of Athlone

Her Royal Highness Princess Alice Mary Victoria Augusta Pauline of Albany, Countess of Athlone, viceregal consort of Canada from 1940 to 1946 (born 25 February 1883 in Berkshire, United Kingdom; died 3 January 1981 in London, United Kingdom). Princess Alice promoted Canadian culture and women’s contributions to the Second World War. She was the last surviving grandchild of Queen Victoria and the last member of the royal family to serve as viceregal consort of Canada.

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Princess Patricia of Connaught

Her Royal Highness Princess Victoria Patricia Helena Elizabeth of Connaught (born 17 March 1886 in London, United Kingdom; died 12 January 1974 in Windlesham, Surrey, United Kingdom). Patricia resided in Canada from 1911 to 1916 and acted as hostess for her father, the Duke of Connaught, during his term as governor general. She gave her name to Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry and became honorary colonel-in-chief in 1918. A talented artist inspired by Canadian landscapes, she exhibited her paintings in Canadian art exhibitions, and examples of her work remain part of Canadian collections.

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Joane Cardinal-Schubert

Joane Cardinal-Schubert, RCA, artist (born 1942 in Red Deer, AB; died 16 September 2009 in Calgary, AB). Award-winning Kainaiwa (Blood) artist Joane Cardinal-Schubert was also a successful and influential curator, lecturer, poet and director of video and Indigenous theatre. Her artworks and writing often addressed contemporary political issues such as Indigenous sovereignty, cultural appropriation and environmental concerns. She supported other Indigenous artists as a curator and activist, while also questioning methods of displaying historical and contemporary Indigenous artworks. She was a member of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts and a recipient of the Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal, the Commemorative Medal of Canada and the National Aboriginal Achievement Award in Art.

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Black Volunteers in the First World War

Archivist Barbara M. Wilson explores the significance of a letter sent to Sir Sam Hughes by George Morton, a letter carrier, barber and civil rights advocate from Hamilton, Ontario. In his letter, dated 7 September 1915, Morton asked the minister of militia and defence why members of the Black community were being turned away when trying to enlist for service with the Canadian Expeditionary Force during the First World War.

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Hal Patterson

Harold Patterson, football player (Born 4 Oct 1932; died at Kinsley, KS, 21 Nov 2011). He became a star CFL player early in his 14-year career as a member of the vaunted MONTREAL ALOUETTES passing attack led by quarterback Sam Etcheverry from 1954 to 1960.

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Jennifer Abel

Raised in Laval, Qué, Abel began DIVING in 1996. During her second year competing nationally, Abel became national champion in the 1 m diving event. Over the next 4 years, Abel continued to compete nationally as an individual diver.

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Blackie and the Rodeo Kings

Blackie & The Rodeo Kings was initially conceived in 1996 as a tribute act to singer-songwriter Willie P. Bennett. By renewing interest in Bennett and other Canadian songwriters, Colin Linden, Stephen Fearing and Tom Wilson believed they would also gain a wider audience for their solo careers.

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Tim Wynne-Jones

Tim Wynne-Jones, author (born at Cheshire, UK 12 Aug 1948). After emigrating to Canada in 1952, Tim Wynne-Jones spent his remaining childhood years in both Vancouver and Ottawa, where his family moved in 1958.

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Ethel Stark

Ethel (Gertrude) Stark. Violinist, conductor, teacher, born Montreal 25 Aug 1910, died there 16 Feb 2012; lauréat (AMQ) 1927, diploma (Curtis) 1934, fellow (Royal Society of Arts) 1980, honorary LL D (Concordia) 1980. Her Austrian-born parents were Adolph and Laura Stark.

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Henri-Marc Ami

Henri-Marc Ami, palaeontologist, prehistorian (b at Belle-Rivière, Qué 23 Nov 1858; d at Menton, France 4 Jan 1931). The son of a Swiss pastor, Ami studied science at McGill, notably under John William DAWSON. He worked for the GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA 1882-1911.

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Claire Harris

Claire Harris, poet (born 13 June 1937 in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad). Harris has written numerous collections of poetry since her first volume, Fables from the Women’s Quarters, was published in 1984. Her work has garnered national and international acclaim — she was nominated for the Governor General’s Award for Poetry, Fables won the Commonwealth Award for Poetry. Harris’ poetry often voices the psychological struggles experienced by women of color who face oppression and violence.

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Louise Penny

Louise Penny, writer (born 1 July 1958 in Toronto, ON). Upon receiving her Bachelor of Applied Arts in Radio and Television Arts from Ryerson Polytechnic in 1979, Louise Penny began a lengthy career as a radio host and journalist with the CBC.

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Cree Code Talkers

Cree code talkers were an elite unit tasked with developing a coded system based on the Cree language for disguising military intelligence. They provided an invaluable service to Allied communications during the Second World War. Although their contributions remained hidden until recently, in part because the code talkers had been sworn to secrecy, their service helped to protect Western Allies and to win the war. Indeed, the Allies’ enemies were never able to break the code.

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Doug Flutie

Douglas Richard Flutie, football player, philanthropist (born 23 October 1962 in Manchester, Maryland). Doug Flutie is widely considered to be one of the greatest players in Canadian Football League (CFL) history. A Heisman Trophy winner as the best player in US college football, Flutie went on to play for eight teams in three different leagues over a 21-year pro football career (1985–2006). A quarterback with the CFL’s BC Lions, Calgary Stampeders and Toronto Argonauts, he appeared in four Grey Cup games and won three championships, earning MVP honours in all three victories. Flutie is the first non-Canadian inducted into Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame (2007). In 1998, he and his wife established the Doug Flutie Jr. Foundation for Autism.