Search for "New France"

Displaying 3341-3360 of 5311 results
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Roloff Beny

Roloff Beny, photographer (b Wilfred Roy Beny at Medicine Hat, Alta 7 Jan 1924; d at Rome, Italy 16 Mar 1984). Beny took up photography as a child. He also painted and had a watercolour show at age 15.

Article

Clovis (Llano)

These big-game hunters sought mammoths, mastodons, camels and horses that were native to North America at the time. Following the retreat of the Wisconsin glaciers, these animals became extinct, hastening the end of this stage of North American Prehistory.

Article

Richard Lacroix

Richard Lacroix, printmaker, painter, sculptor (b at Montréal 14 July 1939). He learned etching, lithography, silk-screen and block printing in Montréal with Albert DUMOUCHEL.

Article

Andrew Bannatyne

Andrew Graham Ballenden Bannatyne, businessman, politician (b on South Ronaldsay, Orkney Is 31 Oct 1829; d at St Paul, Minn 18 May 1889).

Article

Kensington Market

Kensington Market. Toronto rock band, active 1967-9. Named for a downtown Toronto neighbourhood, it was formed by songwriters Keith McKie (vocals, guitar) and Eugene Martynec (guitar, piano), with Alex Darou (bass guitar) and Jimmy Watson (drums).

Article

Arthur Plamondon

(Joseph) Arthur Plamondon. Tenor, teacher, b Montreal 9 June 1881, d near Paris between 1939 and 1945; lauréat (AMQ). He studied paino with Émery Lavigne and then voice with Guillaume Couture, and became a soloist at the Montreal cathedral. He subsequently studied and gave concerts in Paris.

Article

Louise Hirbour

Louise Hirbour. Musicologist, teacher, b Montreal 23 May 1938; B MUS (Montreal) 1964, Certificat d'études supérieures (Sorbonne) 1966, L MUS (Montreal) 1969, D MUS (Montreal) 1975.

Article

Joseph Wiseman

Joseph Wiseman, actor (b at Montréal 15 May 1918; d at Manhattan 19 Oct 2009). Joseph Wiseman is unforgettable as the titular archfiend Dr. No bent on destroying the world in the first James Bond film (1962). Wiseman often played villains of a cerebral nature.

Article

Har Gobind Khorana

Har Gobind Khorana, scientist (born 9 January 1922 in Raipur, India; died 9 November 2011 in Concord, Massachusetts). His mother was illiterate and his family impoverished. His first class was in the open on the edge of the Rajasthan Desert. Khorana's brilliance was obvious early and, with scholarships, he earned degrees in organic chemistry at Punjab University. He obtained a PhD at Liverpool (1948) and then spent three years studying proteins and nucleic acids at Cambridge. In spite of his ability, his race precluded him from appointment as a professor in Britain. In search of an outstanding young scientist, Gordon Shrum, a physicist from the University of British Columbia, hired Khorana to do organic chemistry at the British Columbia Research Council in Vancouver in 1952.

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Frank Stronach (Profile)

Picture this. It is Dec. 26, opening day at Southern California's Santa Anita Race Track. The weather is fabulous: 70°, as they say in the States, and clear enough to see the purply-brown slopes of the San Gabriel Mountains.

Article

Barenaked Ladies

Formed in Scarborough, Ontario, in 1988, the Barenaked Ladies (BNL) first rose to fame in the early 1990s with the release of a demo cassette and a cover of a Bruce Cockburn song, followed by their debut studio album, Gordon (1992), which has since been certified diamond in Canada for sales of more than 1 million copies. Their fourth album, Stunt (1998), sold more than 4 million copies in the United States and yielded the No. 1 hit song “One Week.” Known for their comedic lyrics and quirky alternative rock sound, the Barenaked Ladies were ranked No. 13 on CBC Music’s list of 100 Best Canadian Bands. They have won eight Juno Awards, including three for Best Group, and were inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame in 2018.

Article

Barbara Pentland

Pentland, Barbara. Composer, pianist, teacher, b Winnipeg 2 Jan 1912, d Vancouver 5 Feb 2000; ATCM 1931, composition diploma (Juilliard) 1939, honorary LLD (Manitoba) 1976; honorary LL D (Simon Fraser) 1985.

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Carol Shields (Profile)

By the end of a sunny Monday earlier this month, Winnipeg novelist Carol SHIELDS had been put through the wringer. She had gingerly made her way through a scraggly hedge and leant against a tree to accommodate a magazine photographer.

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Hazel McCallion

​Hazel McCallion, businesswoman, athlete, politician, mayor of Mississauga from 1978 to 2014 (born 14 February 1921 in Port Daniel, QC). One of Canada's longest-serving mayors, McCallion led her city for 12 consecutive terms, only retiring at age 93. Nicknamed “Hurricane Hazel” for her brash political style, she oversaw the development of Mississauga from a semi-rural bedroom community into the sixth-largest city in Canada. McCallion is considered a trailblazer for women in politics.

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David Milgaard Case

David Milgaard was 16 when he was charged in 1969 in the sex slaying of a Saskatoon nurse, Gail Miller. Milgaard's prosecution became one of Canada's most notorious wrongful conviction cases.

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Editorial

Japanese Canadian Internment: Prisoners in their own Country

Beginning in early 1942, the Canadian government detained and dispossessed more than 90 per cent of Japanese Canadians, some 21,000 people, living in British Columbia. They were detained under the War Measures Act and were interned for the rest of the Second World War. Their homes and businesses were sold by the government to pay for their detention. In 1988, Prime Minister  Brian Mulroney apologized on behalf of the Canadian government for the wrongs it committed against Japanese Canadians. The government also made symbolic redress payments and repealed the War Measures Act.

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Peter Dickinson

Dickinson's modernism was of the same patterned and picturesque mode exemplified by the Festival of Britain in 1951. He built economically and with flair, excelling at apartment and office buildings designed to restricted budgets, and for low fees.