Search for ""

Displaying 241-260 of 303 results
Macleans

Newcourt Merges with CIT

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on November 8, 1999. Partner content is not updated.

On May 5, hundreds turned up in their finest for the première of the National Ballet of Canada's revamped production of Swan Lake. Yet, as fabulous as artistic director James Kudelka's $1.6-million production was, an equally remarkable performance had taken place before the dancing ever started.

Macleans

Bronfman Sells DuPont

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on April 17, 1995. Partner content is not updated.

Former film-maker Edgar Bronfman Jr. showed last week that he still has a flair for the dramatic. Investors and analysts were kept on the edge of their seats as the 39-year-old chief executive of Seagram Co. Ltd.

Macleans

Exxon and Mobil to Merge

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on December 14, 1998. Partner content is not updated.

On a chilly spring day in 1911, the decision reverberated through the executive offices of the Standard Oil Trust like a thunderclap: the world’s biggest oil company was to be broken into 34 corporate pieces by order of the U.S. government. Upon hearing this, John D.

Macleans

Mercedes-Chrysler Merge

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on May 18, 1998. Partner content is not updated.

No, Levi-Strauss is not in talks to merge with Italy's Armani. Nor, as far as anyone knows, is McDonald's planning to team up with a chain of snooty French restaurants.

Macleans

Eaton's Seeks Bankruptcy Protection

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on March 10, 1997. Partner content is not updated.

All had gathered to pay their last respects to Signy Eaton, the matriarch of the Eaton clan, widow of John David who had led the family's mighty retail chain in the halcyon days of the 1950s and 1960s, when the company controlled half of the country's department store sales.

Macleans

Thomson Sells His Newspapers

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on February 28, 2000. Partner content is not updated.

It was an empire built upon scratchy radio stations, weekly newspapers and the hardscrabble mentality of Northern Ontario in the midst of the Great Depression. Founder Roy Thomson was like nothing Canada had ever produced.

Macleans

Bre-X Strikes It Rich in Indonesia

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on March 3, 1997 Partner content is not updated.

John Felderhof is pacing like a panther. Boxed in a place he does not want to be. Hounded by people he does not like. He is grey-pale, his skin approximating the color of the smoke that rises from his Marlboro cigarette. Outside, the Jakarta air hangs at 30°C. The scenery is chaotic, Kodachromatic.

Macleans

Belgian Brewery Buys Labatt

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on June 19, 1995. Partner content is not updated.

Then, three months ago, an opening suddenly appeared when takeover artist Gerald Schwartz of Toronto-based Onex Corp. began laying the groundwork for a hostile bid of $2.3 billion for John Labatt Ltd. of Toronto.

Macleans

Newcourt Credit

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on February 23, 1998. Partner content is not updated.

Steven Hudson learned early about the power of performance-based compensation. As a teenager in Scarborough, Ont., he took a job at a bingo hall for seniors, pushing a refreshment cart up and down the aisles. The more chips and popcorn he sold, the more money he took home.

Macleans

Wal-Mart Causes a Revolution

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on May 6, 1996. Partner content is not updated.

Dashing from aisle to aisle in a newly opened Canadian Tire store in Newmarket, Ont., Stephen Bachand looks like a politician in mid-campaign. The U.S.-born businessman pumps hands with employees, shows off the building's features and passionately preaches about the "New Tire.

Macleans

Rogers Buys Vidéotron

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on February 21, 2000. Partner content is not updated.

On Bay Street they call him the king of cable, but Ted Rogers' ambitions have always extended far beyond the television set. For years, the founder and chief executive officer of Rogers Communications Inc.

Macleans

CP Rail Leaves Montreal

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on December 4, 1995. Partner content is not updated.

Ever since the first CP train pulled out of Montreal on June 28, 1886, bound for the new province of British Columbia, Canadian Pacific has played a dominant role in the nation's corporate mythology. And so last week, when CP Ltd.

Macleans

Bronfman Versus Hollywood

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on May 25, 1998. Partner content is not updated.

Montreal's Bronfman family is no stranger to controversy. After arriving in Canada from Russia in the 1890s, they made a fortune outrunning federal tax collectors and selling whisky to American mobsters. The next generation made headlines tussling over control of the family firm, Seagram Co. Ltd.

Macleans

Inside the Rig

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on March 3, 1997. Partner content is not updated.

On this crisp, clear mid-February afternoon, the mechanical colossus - the so-called topsides of the Hibernia drilling rig - towers over the shimmering waters of Newfoundland's Bull Arm.

Macleans

TD Bids for Canada Trust

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on August 16, 1999. Partner content is not updated.

Edmund Clark is accustomed to trouble. Clark, 51, a career civil servant and financial services manager, was once nicknamed "Red Ed" for his role as one of the federal bureaucrats who designed the Trudeau government's National Energy Program in 1980.

Macleans

CN Cuts 3,000 More Jobs

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on November 2, 1998. Partner content is not updated.

Necessary downsizing or corporate greed? Canadian National Railway Co.’s announcement last week of plans to slash 3,000 jobs quickly prompted those diametrically opposed views. CN executives said the cuts were required to make the company more competitive.