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Article

Eugenie Bouchard

Eugenie Bouchard, tennis player (born 25 February 1994 in Montréal, QC). At Wimbledon 2014, Bouchard became the first Canadian singles player to reach the final of a senior Grand Slam singles tennis tournament. Although she lost to Petra Kvitova, the match was watched by over a million Canadians and helped make Bouchard a media sensation. Two years earlier, Bouchard had won the Wimbledon 2012 girls’ tournament, becoming the first Canadian to win a Grand Slam singles title at any level. A two-time winner of the Bobbie Rosenfeld Award (2013 and 2014), she was the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) Newcomer of the Year in 2013 and won a WTA title in Nuremberg, Germany, in 2014.

Article

Cassie Campbell-Pascall

Cassie Dawn Campbell-Pascall (née Campbell), CM, hockey player, broadcaster, administrator (born 22 November 1973 in Richmond Hill, ON). Three-time Olympian Cassie Campbell-Pascall won gold medals in women’s hockey at the 2002 Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City and the 2006 Olympic Winter Games in Turin. She is the only hockey player, man or woman, to captain Canada to two Olympic gold medals. She also won a silver medal with Team Canada at the 1998 Olympic Winter Games in Nagano. Campbell-Pascall won gold with Canada at six Women’s World Hockey Championships (1994, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2004) and silver at the 2005 championships. She scored 100 points (32 goals and 68 assists) in 157 games for Team Canada. She has worked as a broadcaster for CBC’s Hockey Night in Canada since 2006. She has also served on the board of the Canadian Women Hockey’s League (CWHL) and on the selection committee for the Hockey Hall of Fame.

Interview

In Conversation with Kay MacBeth

Kay MacBeth (née MacRitchie) was the last player to join the Edmonton Grads, a women’s basketball team James Naismith, inventor of the game, considered “the finest basketball team that ever stepped out on a floor.” At 95 years old, MacBeth is also the last surviving Grad, a club that played from 1915 to 1940. In those 25 years, the Grads accumulated a record that is quite possibly beyond parallel. Over the course of some 400 official outings, the Grads lost only 20 games. The Grads were both national and world champions who often defeated their opponents by lopsided scores. MacBeth played for the Grads in 1939–40. This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Article

Manon Rhéaume

Manon Rhéaume, hockey player (born 24 February 1972 in Lac-Beauport, Québec). Goaltender Manon Rhéaume was a pioneer in women’s hockey. In 1992, she became the first woman to try out for a National Hockey League (NHL) team and to play in an NHL game. In doing so, she also became the first woman to play in any of North America’s major sports leagues. Rhéaume also represented Canada in international women’s hockey. She was part of the World Championship women’s team in 1992 and 1994, and helped Team Canada win the Olympic silver medal in 1998, the first year that women’s hockey was included in the Olympic Winter Games.

Article

Canadian Women At The Olympic Winter Games

Canadian women have participated in every Olympic Winter Games since their inception in 1924. The first Canadian woman to medal at the Games was figure skater Barbara Ann Scott, who won gold in 1948. Her success was followed by gold medals in such sports as alpine skiing (e.g., Anne Heggtveit in 1960 and Nancy Greene in 1968), speed skating (e.g., Catriona Le May Doan in 1998 and 2002 and Cindy Klassen in 2006), biathlon (Myriam Bédard 1994), and hockey (2002, 2006, 2010 and 2014). Canadian women have also excelled in Olympic sports such as bobsled, snowboarding, short track speed skating, freestyle skiing, and curling. Since the 1948 Olympic Winter Games in St. Moritz, Switzerland, Canadian women have won 105 Olympic medals, including 38 gold medals.

Article

Tara Whitten

During her undergraduate years at the UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA, Whitten ran cross country as a member of the U of A Pandas team.

Article

Abigail Hoffman

Abigail Hoffman, track and field athlete, sport administrator (b at Toronto 11 Feb 1947). As a 9-year-old hockey player, she unwittingly caused controversy by entering a male-dominated sport; she later joined the Toronto Olympic Club and competed at international events.

Macleans

Lorie Kane (Profile)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on August 3, 1998. Partner content is not updated.

It's Friday night at the Javelina Cantina, a Tex-Mex saloon in Tucson, Ariz., and the standing-room-only crowd is ringing in the weekend with pitchers of beer and all-you-can-eat fajitas. Fresh off the golf course, Nancy Lopez and Lorie Kane fit right in.

Article

Sonja Gaudet

Sonja Gaudet (née Melis), Paralympic wheelchair curler (born 22 July 1966 in North Vancouver, British Columbia). A three-time Paralympian, Gaudet won gold for Canada at the 2006 Paralympic Winter Games in Turin, at the 2010 Paralympic Winter Games in Vancouver and at the 2014 Paralympic Winter Games in Sochi. She is the first wheelchair curlerever to win multiple Paralympic gold medals. She is also a three-time world champion, having helped Canada win gold at the World Wheelchair Curling Championship in 2009, 2011 and 2013. Gaudet has been inducted into the Canadian Curling Hall of Fame and the BC Sports Hall of Fame. She was named to Canada's Sports Hall of Fame on 27 May 2020 and will be formally inducted in 2021.

Article

Debbie Brill

Although she has never claimed an Olympic medal, Brill won gold medals in the 1970 Commonwealth Games, the 1971 Pan-American Games and the 1979 World Cup, as well as a silver in the 1978 Commonwealth Games. In 1980 she was named BC's "Athlete of the Decade.

Macleans

Canada's Olympians: Jennifer Heil

Every conversation with Canadian mogul queen Jennifer Heil heralds a new adventure: surfing, Third World development, politely picking the pockets of Canada's business elite, rock climbing, jewellery design - and that thing she does so well with a pair of skis and a total absence of fear.

Article

Laurie Graham

Laurie Graham, alpine skier (b at Orangeville, Ont 30 Mar 1960). A skier from the age of 5, she began competing in the Nancy Greene Ski League at 10 and reached the international circuit at 17, winning the Nor-Am downhill championship in her first year.

Article

Annie Perreault

Perreault missed the Olympics at Lillehammer in 1994 due to a severe concussion sustained at the Canadian Olympic trials. Five months prior to the 1998 games at Nagano, Perreault had surgery on both shins to relieve a chronic problem with compartment syndrome.

Article

Nancy Garapick

Nancy Ellen Garapick, swimmer (b at Halifax 24 Sept 1961). Although proficient in backstroke, butterfly, freestyle and individual medley, she enjoyed possibly her greatest success in the backstroke, setting a world record of 2:16.33 for the 200 m (1975) and a Canadian and Olympic mark of 1:03.

Article

Vicki Keith Munro

Vicki Keith Munro (née Keith), marathon swimmer (born 26 February 1961 in Winnipeg, MB). Vicki Keith Munro is the most successful marathon swimmer in the history of the sport, currently holding an unprecedented 14 world records. Her marathon swimming career began in Kingston, Ont in August 1985 with her first world-record crossing of Lake Ontario (19.3 km in 11½ hours, butterfly stroke). In 1988, Keith Munro became the first person to cross all five Great Lakes.