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Lake of the Woods

Lake of the Woods, 4350 km2 (of which 3149 km2 are in Canada), elevation 323 m, fed by Rainy River from the south and drained to the northwest by the Winnipeg River; it is a remnant of former glacial Lake Agassiz.

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Killiniq Island

Killiniq Island, 269 km2, is located off the northern tip of the Labrador Peninsula on the south side of the entrance to Hudson Strait. The provincial boundary passes across the island, so that its eastern portion belongs to Newfoundland and the rest is part of Nunavut.

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Milk River

WRITING-ON-STONE PROVINCIAL PARK and a natural area in Alberta protect parts of the river's remarkable landscapes. The American explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark gave the Milk River its name (in 1805) because its colour reminded them of a cup of tea mixed with milk.

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Malpeque Bay

Malpeque Bay is a picturesque bay so deeply indented into the northeast coast of Prince Edward Island that its southern edge lies within 7 km of the south coast of the Island.

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Mansel Island

Mansel Island, 112 km long by 48 km wide, is the smallest of 3 islands lying across the entrance to HUDSON BAY. Its topography features a gently undulating limestone lowland with elevations not exceeding 100 m.

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Mackenzie Mountains

Named after Prime Minister Alexander Mackenzie, they are a northern continuation, 800 km long, of the eastern system of the Rocky Mountains, composed almost entirely of folded sedimentary strata.

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Rivière Manicouagan

The Rivière Manicouagan, 560 km long, rises in east-central Québec near the Labrador border and flows south through the Réservoir Manicouagan to the St Lawrence River near Baie-Comeau.

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Îles de la Madeleine

Preceded by Basque fishermen, Jacques Cartier arrived at Île Brion in 1534; he named it in honour of the great French admiral. He christened the islands "Les Araynes" (arènes is a French poetry word for sand) because of the endless beaches of sand. Later French fishermen called them Îles Ramées.

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Chute Montmorency

Chute Montmorency, located 13 km east of Québec City at the mouth of Rivière Montmorency where it empties into the St Lawrence River, is the highest waterfall in the province of Québec and the eighth-highest in Canada.

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Lake Manitoba

Lake Manitoba, 4624 km2, elev 248 m, is one of 3 large lakes occupying the southern half of Manitoba. A narrow, irregular lake, about 200 km long with marshy shores, it is fed mainly from Lake WINNIPEGOSIS, which lies to the northwest, and drains northeast via the Dauphin River to Lake WINNIPEG.

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Miscou Island

Miscou Island, 64 km2, comprises the most eastern part of Gloucester County, New Brunswick, on the west side of the Gulf of St Lawrence and at the entrance to CHALEUR BAY.

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Mountain Range

Mountain ranges generally belong to the same geological structure, and consist of a series of peaks and ridges surrounded by lowlands and valleys. There are many mountain ranges in Canada, including the Rocky Mountains, the St. Elias Mountains and the Laurentian Mountains.

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Lac Mégantic (lake)

Lac Mégantic, 26 km2, elev 395 m, 75 m deep, is located in a depression of the Appalachians in southern Québec, 6 km from the US border. LAC-MÉGANTIC, the only town of the region, is located at its outlet, which is the source of the Rivière CHAUDIÈRE.

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Nueltin Lake

Nueltin Lake, 2279 km2, elev 278 m, max length 144 km, is located on the border of Nunavut and northeastern Manitoba, about 660 km south of the Arctic Circle. An irregularly shaped lake, it has a heavily indented shoreline and contains numerous small islands.