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Stefansson Island

Stefansson Island, 4463 km2, highest elevation 256 m, in the ARCTIC ARCHIPELAGO, is a low, gently rolling, lake-strewn plain. Being largely barren, with continuous vegetation only in wet lowlands, it supports small herds of muskoxen and Peary caribou.

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St Croix River

St Croix River, 121 km long, rises in the Chiputneticook Lakes and flows SE to Passamaquoddy Bay, forming part of the border between NB and Maine. It was discovered (1604) by the French, and de MONTS built the first settlement in Acadia on Ile Sainte-Croix (now St Croix I) near the river's mouth.

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St Marys River (Ont)

The obvious strategic value of the river was well known to the Indigenous people before Étienne Brûlé travelled the river in 1622. Samuel de Champlain included the falls on his 1632 map.

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Saskatchewan River

The Saskatchewan River is 1,939 km long from the Rocky Mountains headwaters to Cedar Lake in central Manitoba. When including its longest tributary, the South Saskatchewan River, the Saskatchewan River is the fourth-longest river in Canada. It’s a major tributary to the Nelson River, ultimately draining into Hudson Bay. Its name is derived from the Cree word kisiskâciwanisîpiy meaning swift-flowing river. The Saskatchewan River was a major transportation route for First Nations for thousands of years and was an instrumental transportation and resource corridor during the fur trade and early European exploration.

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St Mary's Bay

St Mary's Bay, on the south coast of Newfoundland's Avalon Peninsula between Placentia Bay and Trepassey Bay, runs 65 km northeast to Colinet Harbour from its mouth between St Shotts and Point Lance, 32 km northwest.

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Saltspring Island

Saltspring Island, BC, 182 km2 is the largest of the Gulf Islands, a group lying in the Strait of Georgia off the southeastern corner of Vancouver Island.

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Rivière de Rupert

Rivière de Rupert is 763 km long to the head of Lac Témiscamie. It drains Lac Mistassini and then follows a twisted course through a series of lakes and across a flat coastal plain to discharge into southeastern James Bay.

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Saanich Peninsula

Saanich Peninsula, BC, forms part of the Nanaimo Lowlands, along Vancouver Island's east coast. It extends from Sidney in the north to Victoria in the south, and is 33 km long and averages 4 km in width; 90 per cent of its perimeter is fronted by sea. The dominant geographical features are Mount Newton and Saanich Inlet.

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Lake St. Clair

Lake St. Clair, 1,114 km, elevation 175 m, average depth 3.7 m, is bordered by the province of Ontario to the east and the state of Michigan to the west. Almost circular in shape, it has a length of 42 km and a maximum width of 39 km. It is connected to Lake Huron to the north by the St. Clair River and drains into Lake Erie to the south via the Detroit River. Lake St. Clair is part of the St. Lawrence Seaway, a significant transportation route stretching from Lake Superior through the Great Lakes to the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The cities of Windsor, Ontario, and Detroit, Michigan, are located at the southwest end of the lake, making it a popular site for recreational fishing and boating.

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St Clair River

St Clair River, 64 km long, flows in a southerly direction, connecting Lake HURON in the N with Lake ST CLAIR in the S, and forms the international boundary between Canada and the US. Its northern portion has an average width of 0.8 km and depth of 8-18 m.

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Rivière Romaine

Rivière Romaine, 496 km long with a 14 350 km2 basin, rises (elev 760 m) in the Québec-Labrador lacustrine plateau, 45 km southwest of the CHURCHILL RIVER, and forms part of the Québec-Labrador boundary north of the 52nd parallel.

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St. Margarets Bay

St. Margarets Bay, 70 km2, is a small inlet of the Atlantic Ocean on the SE coast of Nova Scotia, 40 km W of HALIFAX. It is a favourite summer resort area, noted especially for its relatively warm surface water, sandy beaches and ideal sailing conditions for small craft.

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Lac Shawinigan

Shawinigan, Lac, 3.2 km2, 6.3 km long, 80 m deep, lies on Québec's Laurentian Plateau, 70 km north of Lac Saint-Pierre on the St Lawrence River. This lake of glacial gouging is prolonged to the east by Petit Lac Shawinigan, Lac Bernard and Lac en Croix.

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Lac Saint-Jean

The Kakouchaks, the local population of Innu, began trading with the Europeans at TADOUSSAC in the 16th century. Later, Lac Saint-Jean was made part of the King's Domain (1674), land reserved for trapping and farmed out to interested parties; a first trading post was built at Métabetchouane in 1676.

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Lake Superior

Lake Superior is one of the largest bodies of fresh water in the world, containing more water than all the other Great Lakes combined. With an area of 82,100 km2 (of which 28,750 km2 lies in Canada), when including the American portion, Lake Superior is Canada’s largest lake. It has a shoreline of 2,938 km, with the north shore bordering on Ontario and the south shore on the states of Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota. The lake is 563 km long, 257 km wide, with a mean depth of 147 m and a maximum depth of 406 m. It has an elevation of 183 m.

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Lake Simcoe

Lake Simcoe, 744 km2, elevation 219 m, is situated in southern Ontario between Georgian Bay and Lake Ontario, 65 km north of Toronto. In the north, The Narrows divides it from Lake Couchiching at Orillia, and both lakes drain northwesterly via the Severn River to Georgian Bay.

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Lac Seul

Lac Seul, 1658 km2, elev 357 m, 55 m deep, located in northwestern Ontario, 50 km N of Dryden, drains W via the English and Winnipeg rivers to Lk Winnipeg.