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Mount Lucania

Lucania, Mount, elevation 5226 m, the third-highest mountain in Canada, is located 29 km east of the Alaska border and 50 km north of Mt LOGAN in the Yukon's St Elias Range. It was named by the duke of Abruzzi, who viewed it from Mount St Elias in 1897.

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Rivière Moisie

Rivière Moisie, 410 km long, rises in eastern Québec from Lac Opocopa and flows south to the St. Lawrence River. With a drainage basin of 19,200 km2 and a mean discharge of 490 m3/s, it is the river of greatest volume along the middle north Shore of the St. Lawrence.

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Winnipeg River

Winnipeg River, 813 km long (to head of Firesteel River), issues from the north end of Lake of the Woods and flows northwest to Lake Winnipeg.

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Attawapiskat River

Attawapiskat River, 748 km long, formed by the confluence of the Pineimuta, Trading and Otoskwin rivers at Attawapiskat Lake, in northeastern Ontario, flows east, jogs north and runs east to the flatland by James Bay. Its drainage area is 50 200 km2 and its mean discharge 626 m3/s.

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Cape St Mary's

Cape St Mary's, elevation 105 m, on Newfoundland's AVALON PENINSULA, is the steep and spectacular terminus of the land separating ST MARY'S BAY and PLACENTIA BAY near rich fishing grounds. The site of a lighthouse since 1860, the

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Skeena River

Skeena River, 580 km long, rises in the northern interior of BC and flows generally SW, draining about 54 000 km2, to meet the Pacific Ocean at Chatham Sound south of Prince Rupert.

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Lake Nipissing

Located in Northern Ontario, between the Ottawa River and Georgian Bay, Lake Nipissing is the third largest lake located entirely within the boundaries of Ontario. The lake spans 65 km in an east–west direction and drains into Georgian Bay via the French River. Its name derives from an Ojibwa word meaning "little water," likely a comparison to the nearby Great Lakes, which were important trade routes for the Nbisiing (Nipissing), the First Nation indigenous to this region. Fishing is a popular activity on the lake both commercially and recreationally. Unfortunately, walleye, the lake’s dominant fish species, has declined drastically since the 1980s as a result of overfishing and ecosystem changes.

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Nunatak

Nunatak (​Inuktitut, "lonely peak"), is a ​mountain rising above large ice sheets.

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Coast

The character of any coastline depends on a combination of factors, including topography, geology, availability of sediment, the prevailing processes of wind, wave, sea ice and tidal conditions, and longer term factors such as GLACIATION and changes in relative sea level.

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Lac Bienville

Lac Bienville, 1249 km2, elevation 426 m, maximum length 89 km, is located in a sparsely populated region of northern Québec. This elongated lake, dotted with numerous islands, is fed by Lacs Louet and Ossant. It drains west, via the Grande Rivière de la Baleine (Great Whale River), into Hudson Bay.

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Bell Island

Bell Island, 34 km2, the largest island in Conception Bay, off Newfoundland's Avalon Peninsula, is a flat outcropping of Ordovician sandstone and shale interbedded with red hematite, an iron ore.

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Yellowhead Pass

Yellowhead Pass, elev 1133 m, crosses the continental divide between Alberta and BC, 25 km W of JASPER. The Miette R flows E from the pass to meet the Athabasca R at Jasper. Yellowhead Lk, on the W side, empties into the Fraser River.

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Stikine River

The Stikine River, 539 km long, rises in the Spatsizi Wilderness Park in northwestern British Columbia and flows in a wide arc north and west out of the Stikine Plateau uplands, then south through the spectacular Coast Mountains range to meet the Pacific Ocean near Wrangell, Alaska.

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Rocky Mountain Trench

The Rocky Mountain Trench is a long and deep valley extending approximately 1,500 km from the Bitterroot Valley in northwest Montana through British Columbia to the Liard Plain just south of the Yukon Territory. Its predominantly flat floor is 3–20 km wide and ranges in elevation between 600 m and 1,000 m above sea level. With walls made of sedimentary, volcanic and igneous rock, the Trench is sometimes referred to as the “Valley of a Thousand Peaks” because of the towering mountain ranges on either side: the Rocky Mountains to the east and the Columbia, Omineca and Cassiar mountains to the west. Humans have relied on the rich resources provided by this distinctive landscape from pre-colonial times to the present.