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Saskatchewan River

The Saskatchewan River is 1,939 km long from the Rocky Mountains headwaters to Cedar Lake in central Manitoba. When including its longest tributary, the South Saskatchewan River, the Saskatchewan River is the fourth-longest river in Canada. It’s a major tributary to the Nelson River, ultimately draining into Hudson Bay. Its name is derived from the Cree word kisiskâciwanisîpiy meaning swift-flowing river. The Saskatchewan River was a major transportation route for First Nations for thousands of years and was an instrumental transportation and resource corridor during the fur trade and early European exploration.

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Killiniq Island

Killiniq Island, 269 km2, is located off the northern tip of the Labrador Peninsula on the south side of the entrance to Hudson Strait. The provincial boundary passes across the island, so that its eastern portion belongs to Newfoundland and the rest is part of Nunavut.

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White Pass

White Pass, elevation 888 m, sits on the Alaska-BC boundary, approximately 125 km south of Whitehorse, YT. In 1887 the federal government sent William OGILVIE to survey the 141st meridian national boundary where it crosses the Yukon River; members of his party found the pass.

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Napaktulik Lake

Napaktulik Lake, 1080 km2, elevation 381 m, maximum length 60 km, is located in Nunavut almost on the Arctic Circle, 173 km south of Kugluktuk, NWT. The lake is fed by a tributary of the COPPERMINE RIVER and drains northeast to BATHURST INLET via the Hood River.

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Seal River

Named for the harbour seals (normally marine creatures) that are found up to 200 km upstream from Hudson Bay, Manitoba's Seal River is formed by the confluence of the North Seal (about 200 km long) and the South Seal (about 240 km long) rivers at Shethanei Lake.

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Cedar Dunes Provincial Park

Tucked into the westernmost corner of Prince Edward Island, Cedar Dunes Provincial Park (established 1962, 37 ha) has been developed around an historic lighthouse. Known as West Point, the site is the result of centuries of accretion of sand from a north to south coastal current.

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Stikine River

The Stikine River, 539 km long, rises in the Spatsizi Wilderness Park in northwestern British Columbia and flows in a wide arc north and west out of the Stikine Plateau uplands, then south through the spectacular Coast Mountains range to meet the Pacific Ocean near Wrangell, Alaska.

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Nettilling Lake

Nettilling Lake, 5542 km2, elevation 30 m, max length 123 km, is located toward the south end of Baffin Island in the Great Plain of the Koukdjuak, about 110 km southwest of Auyuittuq National Park and 280 km northwest of Iqaluit. The name is of Inuktitut origin but its meaning is unclear.

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Detroit River

The Detroit River, 52 km long, flows south from Lake ST CLAIR to the west end of Lake ERIE, forming part of the boundary between Ontario and Michigan. Detroit, Michigan, and WINDSOR, Ontario, dominate its shores. Part of the ST LAWRENCE SEAWAY, it is heavily used by commercial traffic.

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Hillsborough River

The Hillsborough River begins near the white sand beaches of the north shore and winds 45 km through rich farm country to its mouth (Charlottetown Harbour) on the south shore of Prince Edward Island. At its mouth, the North and West rivers come together to meet the Hillsborough.

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Deer Island

Deer Island abuts the border with the US at the entrance to Passamaquoddy Bay on the south coast of New Brunswick. Long in dispute with the US, sovereignty over the island passed to NB in 1817. The name is probably descriptive. Fishing is the most important economic activity.

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Cormorant Island

Cormorant Island is a small, wooded island fringed with rock beaches close to the northeast coast of Vancouver Island. ALERT BAY, a fishing port and commercial centre for nearby logging communities, is located on its south shore. The island boasts some of the finest TOTEM POLES on the BC coast.

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Lac la Martre

Lac la Martre, 1777 km2, elev 265 m, max length 76 km, is located in the Northwest Territories, 50 km west of Behchokò and 150 km northwest of Yellowknife, and 346 km south of the Arctic Circle. The settlement of WHATÌ is located at the southeastern corner of the lake.

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Bay d'Espoir

Bay d'Espoir is a fjordlike arm of Hermitage Bay on Newfoundland's south coast, entered between West Head and Dawson Point, 3 km northwest. More than 50 km from mouth to head, ice-free Bay d'Espoir (French for "hope") has sheer cliffs and steep-sided hills rising 180 to 300 m.

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Amadjuak Lake

Amadjuak Lake, 3115 km2, elevation 113 m, is one of 2 lakes situated in the Great Plain of the Koukdjuak in south-central Baffin Island. This lower-lying area only emerged recently (in geological terms) from beneath the waters of Foxe Basin. Amadjuak Lake is the third-largest in Nunavut.

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Rivière Moisie

Rivière Moisie, 410 km long, rises in eastern Québec from Lac Opocopa and flows south to the St. Lawrence River. With a drainage basin of 19,200 km2 and a mean discharge of 490 m3/s, it is the river of greatest volume along the middle north Shore of the St. Lawrence.

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Toronto Feature: Mimico Creek

This text is from the free Toronto in Time app, which was created by The Canadian Encyclopedia and is available from the App Store and the Google Play store. Visit its companion website, which is linked below, to explore all the features of the app online.

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Continental Divides in Canada

A continental divide is a ridge or natural boundary of elevated terrain that separates the drainage basins of a continent. Each drainage basin contributes its water to river systems, which in turn flow into distinct larger bodies of water, such as oceans. The main continental divide in Canada follows the ridge of the Rocky Mountains.

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North

In strictly geographic terms, the North refers to the immense hinterland of Canada that lies beyond the narrow strip of the country in which most Canadians live and work, but generally refers to the Northwest Territories, the Yukon and Nunavut.