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Peace River

Peace River, 1,923 km long, is one of the principal tributaries of the Mackenzie River system. The name of the river refers to a settlement between Cree and Dane-Zaa (Beaver) warring parties around 1781 at Peace Point at the lower portion of the river. The Dane-Zaa word for the river is unchaga, meaning “big river”; the Cree word for the settlement there is sâkitawâhk.

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Eskimo Lakes

Eskimo Lakes, 880 km2, lie along the southern edge of the Tuktoyaktuk Peninsula, NWT, and drain into Liverpool Bay on the Beaufort Sea. They are tidal lakes, with tide heights averaging 2 m, and occupy a fault zone separating geological blocks.

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Lac Saint-Jean

The Kakouchaks, the local population of Innu, began trading with the Europeans at TADOUSSAC in the 16th century. Later, Lac Saint-Jean was made part of the King's Domain (1674), land reserved for trapping and farmed out to interested parties; a first trading post was built at Métabetchouane in 1676.

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Moose River

The Moose River is 547 km long from the head of its tributary, the Mattagami River. It is formed by the confluence of the Mattagami and the Missinaibi rivers, and flows northeast 104 km to discharge into the bottom of James Bay in northern Ontario.

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Coppermine River

The Coppermine River, 845 km long, rises in the Barren Lands of the Northwest Territories in Lac de Gras and flows northwest through Point Lake to Coronation Gulf on the Arctic Ocean. The majority of its course lies in Nunavut.

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Southampton Island

Southampton Island, 41 214 km2, is situated between FOXE BASIN and HUDSON BAY. It combines the 2 basic regional relief types. Its north and northeast consist of undulating highlands of Precambrian SHIELD rocks, reaching

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Hayes River

The Hayes River, 483 km long, rises in Molson Lake (399 km2) northeast of Lake Winnipeg, flows northeast to Oxford Lake (401 km2) and Knee Lake, through the rock and bush of the Canadian Shield, across the clay flats of the Hudson Bay Lowlands and into the bay at YORK FACTORY.

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Cascade Mountains

Cascade Mountains, BC, are the north end of largely volcanic mountain ranges extending to California, 180-260 km east of the Pacific Ocean. There are no active volcanoes in BC like the US Cascades' Mount St Helens and others.

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Ellesmere Island

Ellesmere Island, at 196,236 km2, is the third-largest island in Canada, the 10th-largest island in the world and the most northerly island in the Arctic Archipelago. It is located in Nunavut and is separated from Greenland by Kane Basin and Kennedy Channel, and from Devon Island to the south by Jones Sound. Cape Columbia (83°06´ 41" N lat) is Canada's most northerly point of land.

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Mount Assiniboine

Mount Assiniboine, elevation 3618 m, the highest mountain between the Trans-Canada Highway and the US border in the Rocky Mts, is often called "The Matterhorn of the Canadian Rockies."

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Bras d'Or Lake

Bras d'Or Lake, 1099 km2, is an arm of the Atlantic Ocean occupying the centre of Cape Breton Island that nearly divides the island in two. On the north it is linked to the ocean by a narrow channel down the west side of Boularderie Island.

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Restigouche River

Restigouche River (Ristigouche in Québec), 200 km long, rises in the highlands of northwestern New Brunswick as the Little Main Restigouche River.

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Bathurst Island

Bathurst Island, 16 042 km2 and over 18 000 km2 including its offshore islands, is located in the Arctic Archipelago. The present position of the North magnetic pole is near its northern end.

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Lac Guillaume-Delisle

Lac Guillaume-Delisle, 712 km2, is a large, triangular, saltwater lake in northern Québec, connected to the eastern shore of Hudson Bay by Le Goulet, a 5 km long narrow channel.

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Hecate Strait

Hecate Strait is a body of water 48-140 km wide, underlain by a shallow basin (less than 45 m at the north end) separating Haida Gwaii from mainland British Columbia.

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Îles de la Madeleine

Preceded by Basque fishermen, Jacques Cartier arrived at Île Brion in 1534; he named it in honour of the great French admiral. He christened the islands "Les Araynes" (arènes is a French poetry word for sand) because of the endless beaches of sand. Later French fishermen called them Îles Ramées.