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Article

Daniel Johnson, Jr.

Daniel Johnson, GOQ, business leader, politician and premier of Québec (born 24 December 1944 in Montréal, Québec). The Vice-President of Power Corporation of Canada from 1978 to 1981, Johnson also served as a member of Québec’s National Assembly for over 25 years. After the resignation of Premier Robert Bourassa, Johnson was elected leader of the Quebec Liberal Party, and on 11 January 1994, he became the 25th premier of Québec. However, he held on to this position for only eight months: in September 1994, the Liberals lost the Québec general election to the Parti Québécois. Johnson then served as leader of the Official Opposition for nearly three years, successfully leading the “No” camp in the Québec referendum campaign of 1995. He left politics in May 1998 and subsequently worked as a lawyer and as a negotiator for the government of Québec, while also sitting on several boards of directors.

Article

Frederick Charles Alderdice

Frederick Charles Alderdice, businessman, politician (b at Belfast, Ire 10 Nov 1872: d at St John's 26 Feb 1936). He was twice prime minister of Newfoundland, August-November 1928 and June 1932-February 1934, and the last person to hold that office before confederation with Canada.

Article

Henry Perrin Beatty

Henry Perrin Beatty, politician (b at Toronto 1 June 1950). After graduating from Toronto's Upper Canada College, Beatty received a general BA at University of Western Ontario in 1971.

Editorial

Women on Canadian Banknotes

Though Queen Elizabeth II has appeared on the $20 bill since she was eight years old, identifiable Canadian women have only appeared on a Canadian banknote once. In 2004, the statue of the Famous Five from Parliament Hill and Olympic Plaza in Calgary, and the medal for the Thérèse Casgrain Volunteer Award were featured on the back of the $50 note. They were the first Canadian women to appear on our currency. However, in 2011, they were replaced by an icebreaker named for a man (see Roald Amundsen). The new bill was part of a series of notes meant to highlight technical innovation and achievement, but the change sparked controversy. Other than the image of a nameless female scientist on the $100 note issued in 2011, and two female Canadian Forces officers and a young girl on the $10 bill issued in 2001, Canadian women were absent from Canadian bills.

On 8 March 2016, International Women’s Day, the Bank of Canada launched a public consultation to choose an iconic Canadian woman who would be featured on a banknote, released in the next series of bills in 2018. More than 26,000 submissions poured in. Of those, 461 names met the qualifying criteria, and the list was pared down to a long list of 12 and finally a short list of five. The final selection will be announced on 8 December 2016.

But how did we get here?

Article

Elias Hardy

Elias Hardy, lawyer, politician (b at Farnham, Surrey, Eng c 1744; d at Saint John 25 Dec 1798). Hardy immigrated to Virginia in 1775; like most LOYALISTS he sympathized with America in its quarrel with Britain but opposed the ultimate solution of colonial independence.

Article

Charles Apps

Apps entered politics in 1940, pursuing it with the same skill and determination that he brought to hockey. He ran as a federal CONSERVATIVE PARTY candidate in the 1940 election but lost to the Liberal incumbent.

Article

Jean J. Charest

Jean J. Charest, lawyer, politician, premier of Québec from 2003 to 2012 (born at Sherbrooke, Qué, 24 June 1958). Charest received both his undergraduate degree and a degree in law at Sherbrooke University. He was first elected as Member of Parliament for Sherbrooke in 1984.

Article

Alfred Schmitz Shadd

Alfred Schmitz Shadd, educator, physician, farmer, politician, pharmacist, editor, civic leader (born 1870 in Raleigh Township, Kent County, ON; died 1915 in Winnipeg, MB).

Article

Catherine Callbeck

In 1988 she returned to politics, this time at the federal level, winning the PEI riding of Malpeque for the Liberals. Following the resignation of PEI premier Joe Ghiz, Callbeck announced she wished to succeed him.

Article

John Neilson

John Neilson. Publisher, politician, b Balmaghie, Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland, 17 Jul 1776, d Quebec City 1 Feb 1848.

Article

Dennis O'Keefe

Dennis Michael John “Doc” O’Keefe, teacher, municipal politician, mayor of St. John’s 2008–present (born 20 April 1944 in St. John’s, NL). A retired school teacher, and a city council member since 1997, O’Keefe is a consumer-and cruise ship industry-advocate known for his approachability, and his daily walks of the streets of St. John’s.

Article

Jean Lapierre

Jean C. Lapierre, lawyer, politician, co-founder of the Bloc Québécois, and media commentator (born 7 May 1956 in the Magdalen Islands, QC; died there 29 March 2016).

Article

Hazel McCallion

​Hazel McCallion, businesswoman, athlete, politician, mayor of Mississauga from 1978 to 2014 (born 14 February 1921 in Port Daniel, QC). One of Canada's longest-serving mayors, McCallion led her city for 12 consecutive terms, only retiring at age 93. Nicknamed “Hurricane Hazel” for her brash political style, she oversaw the development of Mississauga from a semi-rural bedroom community into the sixth-largest city in Canada. McCallion is considered a trailblazer for women in politics.

Article

Don Iveson

​Donald L. Iveson, university student advocate, journalist, mayor of Edmonton (born 30 May 1979 in St. Albert, AB).