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Clear Grits

Clear Grits, Upper Canadian Reformers who became discontented with the conservatism of the Baldwin-LaFontaine ministry after 1849.

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Jim Coutts

James Allan Coutts, politician, businessman (born 16 May 1938 in High River, Alberta; died 31 December 2013 in Toronto, Ontario).

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Prime Minister of Canada

The prime minister (PM) is the head of the federal government. It is the most powerful position in Canadian politics. Prime ministers are not specifically elected to the position; instead, the PM is typically the leader of the party that has the most seats in the House of Commons. The prime minister controls the governing party and speaks for it; names senators and senior judges for appointment; and appoints and dismisses all members of Cabinet. As chair of Cabinet, the PM controls its agenda and greatly influences the activities and priorities of Parliament. In recent years, a debate has emerged about the growing power of prime ministers, and whether this threatens other democratic institutions.

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Jagmeet Singh

Jagmeet Singh “Jimmy” Dhaliwal, leader of the New Democratic Party of Canada 2017–present, MP, MPP, lawyer (born 2 January 1979 in Scarborough, ON). Jagmeet Singh served as an Ontario MPP from 2011 until 2017, when he won the leadership of the federal New Democratic Party (NDP). This made him the first racialized leader of a major national political party in Canada. He was also the first turban-wearing Sikh elected to the Ontario legislature. Singh has consistently rated higher than other federal party leaders in public opinion polls but has yet to translate that into national electoral success. He has been the Member of Parliament for Burnaby South since 2019.

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Daniel Johnson, Jr.

Daniel Johnson, GOQ, business leader, politician and premier of Québec (born 24 December 1944 in Montréal, Québec). The Vice-President of Power Corporation of Canada from 1978 to 1981, Johnson also served as a member of Québec’s National Assembly for over 25 years. After the resignation of Premier Robert Bourassa, Johnson was elected leader of the Quebec Liberal Party, and on 11 January 1994, he became the 25th premier of Québec. However, he held on to this position for only eight months: in September 1994, the Liberals lost the Québec general election to the Parti Québécois. Johnson then served as leader of the Official Opposition for nearly three years, successfully leading the “No” camp in the Québec referendum campaign of 1995. He left politics in May 1998 and subsequently worked as a lawyer and as a negotiator for the government of Québec, while also sitting on several boards of directors.

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George Alexander Drew

In 1948 he entered national politics as party leader, but he failed in 2 elections to mount an effective challenge to the Liberal administration. He resigned as leader 1956 and was appointed Canadian high commissioner to London, England, in 1957 - the last distinction in a noteworthy public career.

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Frederick Peters

Frederick Peters, lawyer, premier of PEI (b at Charlottetown 8 Apr 1852; d at Prince Rupert, BC 29 July 1919). A brother of Arthur PETERS, Frederick was elected to the assembly in 1890 as a Liberal and became premier 22 April 1891, serving until resigning on 27 October 1897.

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Guy Favreau

Guy Favreau, lawyer, politician (b at Montréal 20 May 1917; d there 11 July 1967). Favreau was a prominent Montréal lawyer who was elected to the House of Commons in the 1963 election.

Macleans

Chrétien's New Cabinet

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on June 23, 1997. Partner content is not updated.

As usual, the makeup of the cabinet sent out unmistakable signals about the government's priorities and intentions. In addition to Chrétien, there are 22 other Ontarians and Quebecers in the group, reflecting Liberal strength in the centre of the country.

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Frank McKenna

Frank Joseph McKenna, PC, OC, ONB, lawyer, politician, businessman, diplomat, premier of New Brunswick 1987–97 (born 19 January 1948 in Apohaqui, NB). McKenna became premier in only the second complete election sweep in Canadian history. Once called the "tiny, perfect premier," his decade in office was marked by a heavy focus on job creation. Despite his popularity in Liberal Party circles, he rejected an opportunity to run for the leadership of the federal party, in favour of corporate directorship.

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Bernard Lord

Bernard Lord, lawyer, businessman, premier of New Brunswick 1999-2006 (born 27 September 1965 in Roberval, QC). After becoming New Brunswick's youngest elected premier at age 33, Lord successfully revised the province's Official Languages Act and introduced widely praised measures to improve bilingual services.

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Anne Cools

Anne Clare Cools, administrator, community worker, senator (born on 12 August 1943 in Barbados, British West Indies). An influential Black Canadian activist, Anne Cools served four months in jail for her role in the Sir George Williams Affair, for which she was pardoned in 1981. She founded Women in Transition, one of Canada’s first shelters for female victims of violence. She also served on the National Parole Board of Canada. In 1984, she became the first Black Canadian to be named to the Senate. She served as a Liberal, Conservative and independent senator for more than 30 years, and was known as the Dean of the Senate for her knowledge of parliamentary history and procedure.

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Jean Charest

Jean Charest, lawyer, politician, premier of Quebec from 2003 to 2012 (born on 24 June 1958 in Sherbrooke, Qc). As a member of the Progressive Conservative Party, he became the youngest person to be appointed a Cabinet member. Between 1993 and 1998, he led the party after Kim Campbell resigned. Charest then became the leader of the Quebec Liberal Party and acted as premier of Quebec from 2003 until 2012. In 2022, he joined Historica Canada’s board of directors.

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George Henry Murray

George Henry Murray, lawyer, politician, premier of Nova Scotia (b at Grand Narrows, NS 7 June 1861; d at Montréal 6 Jan 1929). Murray's unbroken 27 years in power (1896-1923) is a British Empire and Commonwealth record. Leadership of the Nova Scotia Liberal Party fell to Murray when W.S.

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Andrew Blair

Andrew George Blair, lawyer, politician, premier of NB (b at Fredericton NB 7 Mar 1844; d there 25 Jan 1907). First elected MLA for York in 1878, he became leader of the Opposition in 1879, premier and attorney general in 1883, and molded his coalition into the New Brunswick Liberal Party.