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Canadian Sports History

Sports have a long history in Canada, from early Indigenous games (e.g., baggataway) to more recent sports such as snowboarding and kitesurfing. Officially, Canada has two national sports: lacrosse (summer) and hockey (winter).

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Football

For many years, the term football described the practice of kicking an object, usually a round ball, and directing it into a designated goal area.

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Camping

Camping may be defined as living in a temporary or mobile shelter in the outdoors, whether a lean-to, tent or camper van.

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Bridge

Bridge is a card game played by 4 people, 2 in each of 2 partnerships. Contract bridge evolved from whist through bridge whist and auction bridge. Harold S.

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Canadian Grand Prix

From 1971 to 1977, (except 1975), the Canadian stage of the world circuit took place at Mosport. In 1977, Jody Scheckter, in his Wolf Ford, was the last Mosport champion. The drivers then refused to participate in the racing judging the track too dangerous.

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Boxing

Boxing is a contest between two opponents wearing padded gloves who attempt to win by rendering their opponents unable to continue, or by winning a judge's decision at the end of a prearranged number of rounds. Boxers may hit only with their fists and from the waist up.

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Billiards

Billiard games have been played for several hundred years and have been popular in North America since the early 1800s. In Canada, snooker is the most popular of these games, with some pool and varieties of billiards also being played.

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Davis Cup

Considered the world's pre-eminent men's team tennis tournament, the Davis Cup made its debut in 1900 when a Harvard student named Dwight Filley Davis donated the silver trophy as the prize for a team tournament that summer at the Longwood Cricket Club in Boston.

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Kayak

For over 2,000 years, the Inuit have used kayaks for traveling and hunting expeditions, except for the most northerly polar Inuit.

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BC Lions

The BC Lions are a professional football franchise that plays in the West Division of the Canadian Football League (CFL). Since 1954, the team has won six Grey Cup championships.

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Chess

About 20% of adult Canadians play at least one game of chess a year. These games are mostly played for fun in backyards and basements, but for several thousand tournament players chess is a serious game.

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Ball Hockey

Ball hockey is a fast, skilful sport, with leagues operating in all Canadian provinces. The game traces its ancestry to the simple stick-and-ball games of the Middle Ages.

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Hockey Canada

Hockey Canada is the official governing body of hockey in Canada, representing the country as a member of the International Ice Hockey Federation.

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Calder Memorial Trophy

The Calder Memorial Trophy is awarded annually “to the player selected as the most proficient in his first year of competition in the National Hockey League.” First presented in 1933, the trophy is named for Frank Calder, who was president of the NHL from 1917 to 1943. The winner is chosen through a poll of the Professional Hockey Writers’ Association at the end of the regular season and is awarded after the Stanley Cup playoffs. Players who have won the trophy and gone on to stardom include Terry Sawchuk, Bobby Orr, Ken Dryden, Ray Bourque, Mario Lemieux and Martin Brodeur.

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Saskatchewan Roughriders

The Saskatchewan Roughriders are a team that plays in the Western Conference of the Canadian Football League. They are the oldest continuously operating professional football club in western Canada, and second only to the Toronto Argonauts of the Eastern Conference in length of history. One of only three community owned football teams in the CFL, they play their games in Regina, the least populated sports market in Canada; only the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League are based in a smaller centre. Like the Packers, however, the Roughriders are famed for the intensity of their supporters, known as “Rider Nation,” many of whom live well beyond the borders of Saskatchewan.

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Underwater Diving

The first workable diving suit was developed by Augustus Siebe of England about 1839. This waterproof suit had a detachable helmet connected to the surface by a hose through which air was pumped.

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