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Article

Bye Bye Blues

Daisy has to make her way in a man's world, trying to keep body and soul together, discovering at the same time that she takes pleasure in performing. And here Rebecca Jenkins shines.

Article

Habitat 67

Habitat 67 is an experimental urban residential complex designed by Israeli-born architect Moshe Safdie and located in the Cité du Havre neighbourhood south of Montréal’s Old Port sector. Commissioned by the Canadian Corporation for Expo 67, the project derives its name from the theme of the fair, “Man and His World,” and became one of the major pavilions of the exhibition. It is the only remaining structure from Expo 67 to retain its original function. In 2015, the Guardian called Habitat “a functioning icon of 1960s utopianism, and one of that period’s most important buildings.”

Article

Aleatoric Music

Aleatoric Music. Music in which either composition or method of performance is determined by elements of chance or unpredictability.

Article

La vraie nature de Bernadette

At a time when the once all-powerful Catholic Church had lost its grip on Québécois, director Gilles Carle made this sardonic fable about a woman’s quest to find spiritual harmony on her own terms. It won five Canadian Film Awards — including best director, screenplay, lead actress and supporting actor — and was also very popular in France, where it screened in competition at the Cannes Film Festival. Considered one of the best Canadian films ever made, it was named one of the Top 10 Canadian films of all time in a poll conducted by the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) in 1984, and one of 150 essential works in Canadian cinema history in a similar poll in 2016.

Article

Alternative Media in Canada

Alternative media provide a range of perspectives and ideas that are not necessarily available in the profit-driven media products and outlets that dominate the Canadian mediascape. They include traditional media forms, such as books, newspapers, magazines, television, radio and film, as well as nontraditional and so-called “new media” forms such as zines and online publications and podcasts. Some definitions also include street theatre, murals, postering and culture jamming.

Article

Dutch Music in Canada

The first Dutch immigrants to Canada arrived via the USA during the late-18th and early-19th centuries as part of the United Empire Loyalist contingent. By 1867 there were 29,000 persons of Dutch origin; in 1986 there were more than 850,000, many of whom arrived soon after World War II.

Article

Wavelength

Michael SNOW's Wavelength (1967), Canada's most famous and widely seen EXPERIMENTAL FILM, is a minimalist masterpiece and an important, influential work in the history of cinema.

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Les Petits chanteurs de Granby

Les Petits chanteurs de Granby. Choir school of about 100 children's and men's voices. It was founded in 1931 in Granby (60 km east of Montreal) by Brother Julien Hamelin of the Frères du Sacré-Coeur. The ensemble enjoyed the official patronage of the city.

Article

Barney's Version

The film Barney's Version (2010), produced by Robert Lantos and directed by Richard J. Lewis, takes on the challenge of adapting Mordecai Richler's unruly onslaught of a final novel.

Article

Barenaked Ladies

Formed in Scarborough, Ontario, in 1988, the Barenaked Ladies (BNL) first rose to fame in the early 1990s with the release of a demo cassette and a cover of a Bruce Cockburn song, followed by their debut studio album, Gordon (1992), which has since been certified diamond in Canada for sales of more than 1 million copies. Their fourth album, Stunt (1998), sold more than 4 million copies in the United States and yielded the No. 1 hit song “One Week.” Known for their comedic lyrics and quirky alternative rock sound, the Barenaked Ladies were ranked No. 13 on CBC Music’s list of 100 Best Canadian Bands. They have won eight Juno Awards, including three for Best Group, and were inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame in 2018.

Article

Icelandic Music In Canada

The first large group of Icelanders arrived in Canada in 1873 and by 1875 had settled on the western shore of Lake Winnipeg. Their colony (which included present-day Gimli and Riverton, Man), was known as New Iceland, was self-governing, and had its own constitution.