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Rebellions of 1837

Upper and Lower Canada were thrown into turmoil from 1837–38, when insurgents mounted rebellions in each colony against the Crown and the political status quo. The revolt in Lower Canada was the more serious and violent of the two.

Macleans

Playing with fire

How North Vancouver’s Rebecca Rubin landed in the crosshairs of the biggest eco-terrorism investigation in U.S. history, and spent 10 years on the run. Ken MacQueen on a tale of sabotage, conspiracy, violence and betrayal.

Article

Canadian Film History: 1974 to Present

Filmmaking is a powerful form of cultural and artistic expression, as well as a highly profitable commercial enterprise. From a practical standpoint, filmmaking is a business involving large sums of money and a complex division of labour. This labour is involved, roughly speaking, in three sectors: production, distributionand exhibition. The history of the Canadian film industry has been one of sporadic achievement accomplished in isolation against great odds. Canadian cinema has existed within an environment where access to capital for production, to the marketplace for distribution and to theatres for exhibition has been extremely difficult. The Canadian film industry, particularly in English Canada, has struggled against the Hollywood entertainment monopoly for the attention of an audience that remains largely indifferent toward the domestic industry. The major distribution and exhibition outlets in Canada have been owned and controlled by foreign interests. The lack of domestic production throughout much of the industry’s history can only be understood against this economic backdrop.

This article is one of four that surveys the history of the film industry in Canada. The entire series includes: Canadian Film History: 1896 to 1938; Canadian Film History: 1939 to 1973; Canadian Film History: 1974 to Present; Canadian Film History: Notable Films and Filmmakers 1980 to Present.

Article

Natural Gas in Canada

Natural gas ranks among the fastest-growing energy sources in Canada and is seen by many in the energy industry as a game-changer, a comparatively clean, low-cost and versatile fuel. It can directly generate power and heat and can be chemically altered to produce a wide range of useful commodity chemicals. It burns cleaner and more efficiently than other fossil fuels, releasing significantly fewer harmful pollutants into the atmosphere. Natural gas is colorless, odourless, shapeless, lighter than air and contains a mixture of several hydrocarbon gases, which are organic compounds consisting of some combination of hydrogen and carbon molecules.

The primary consumers of natural gas are the industrial (54.1 per cent), residential (26.6 per cent) and commercial sectors (19.3 per cent). Canada is the fifth largest natural gas producer after the United States, Russia, Iran and Qatar. Currently, all of Canada’s natural gas exports go to the United States through a network of pipelines, making Canada the largest foreign source of US natural gas imports. At the end of 2016, Canada had 76.7 trillion cubic feet of proven natural gas reserves and had produced 152 billion cubic metres of natural gas that year. It is forecasted that global natural gas consumption will double by 2035.

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Toronto FC

Toronto FC (also known as TFC or “The Reds”) is a men’s professional soccer team that plays in Major League Soccer (MLS). Founded in 2006 by Maple Leaf Sports & Entertainment, the club has won the Voyageurs Cup seven times (2009–2012 and 2016–18). They have made it to the MLS playoffs three times (2015, 2016 and 2017), becoming the first Canadian club to reach the MLS Cup final in 2016 and the first to win the MLS Cup in 2017. TFC has competed in the CONCACAF Champions League five times, making it as far as the finals in 2018. The club is one of three MLS franchises in Canada, including Montreal Impact and Vancouver Whitecaps FC.

Macleans

Bre-X Strikes It Rich in Indonesia

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on March 3, 1997 Partner content is not updated.

John Felderhof is pacing like a panther. Boxed in a place he does not want to be. Hounded by people he does not like. He is grey-pale, his skin approximating the color of the smoke that rises from his Marlboro cigarette. Outside, the Jakarta air hangs at 30°C. The scenery is chaotic, Kodachromatic.

Article

Rogers Cup

The Rogers Cup is the third-oldest tennis tournament in the world behind Wimbledon (founded in 1877) and the US Open (founded in 1880). Founded in 1881 as the Canadian National Championships, it included women’s tournaments beginning in 1892 and remained an amateur event until 1967. It began admitting professionals and became known as the Canadian Open in 1968, when it also introduced prize money into the men’s competition. Prize money for the women’s tournament was introduced in 1973. In 2018, the total purses for the men’s and women’s tournaments were $5,939,970 and $2,820,000, respectively. Past champions have included Chris Evert, Martina Navratilova, Steffi Graf, Monica Seles, Serena Williams, Ivan Lendl, John McEnroe, Boris Becker, Andre Agassi, Roger Federer, Andy Murray, Novak Djokovic and Rafael Nadal. Notable Canadian competitors have included Carling Bassett-Seguso, Helen Kelesi, Eugenie Bouchard, Daniel Nestor, Sébastien Lareau, Milos Raonic and Denis Shapovalov. Robert Bédard was the last Canadian men’s singles champion (1958). In 2019, Bianca Andreescu became the first Canadian to win the tournament since Faye Urban won as women’s singles champion in 1969.

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Computer Science

During the 1950s, 4 main areas of focus emerged. "Hardware" concentrated on the construction of reliable equipment with faster central-processing units (CPUs), larger memories and more input and output devices to solve increasingly ambitious problems.