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Grand Theatre

Grand Theatre The original Grand Opera House opened amid a strong amateur and professional theatrical tradition on 8 Sept 1881 in the upper floors of the Masonic Temple at London, Ont. At its peak in the 1890s, the 2070-seat Grand was host to 100 companies and 300 performances annually.

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St Lawrence Hall

In 1967, as a Toronto centennial project, the building was restored, and the auditorium came into use again for social functions and chamber music concerts.The building also houses the administrative offices and rehearsal rooms of the National Ballet of Canada.

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Fort Amherst

Fort Amherst, on the west shore of Charlottetown Harbour, PEI, was built in late 1758 by the British. The site had been known previously as Port La Joie, established in 1720 as the capital of the French colony of Île Saint-Jean.

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Eaton Centre

The Eaton Centre, Toronto (designed by the Zeidler Partnership and Bregman and Hamann, phase 1 opening in 1977, phase 2 in 1979) is the epitome of those vast multistorey interior "atrium" spaces for which Canadian architecture became known internationally in the 1970s. The centre comprises The T.

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Condominium

Owners in a condominium project are responsible for all expenses relating to their own individual unit, but in addition the condominium owners must pay their share of the expenses relating to the common areas.

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CN Tower

The CN Tower, Toronto, was the world's tallest free-standing structure until 2007, when the Burj Khalifa in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, surpassed it.

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The Grange

Grange, The Throughout its history this elegant brick building, constructed about 1817 on a 40 ha property stretching from Queen to Bloor streets, has been linked to the social, intellectual and political life of Toronto. Built

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House

 House usually refers to a building that serves as living quarters for one or several families. House forms and building styles have changed throughout history in response to socioeconomic forces as well as to climatic conditions inherent to particular geographic locations.

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Montmorency

The Montmorency Manoir, built in 1781 by Frederick HALDIMAND, governor general in chief of Canada, was inhabited 1791-94 by the duke of Kent, father of Queen Victoria. First known as the "Kent House," it suffered a devastating fire in 1993 but was rebuilt by the following year.

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Monument

A monument is normally a freestanding, large-scale structure, often artistically embellished, which has as its primary function the commemoration of persons, events or concepts believed to have sufficient importance to merit a public, visible and permanent tribute.