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Canadian Centre for Architecture

The Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) is both a museum of architecture and a research institute. It is located in Shaughnessy Village, a neighbourhood in downtown Montreal. Internationally renowned, the CCA is the primary Canadian institute devoted to the study of architecture. It was founded in 1979 by architect Phyllis Lambert to raise public awareness of the importance of architecture in society and to encourage innovation and university research regarding architecture.

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Soulpepper Theatre

Toronto’s Soulpepper Theatre was founded in 1998 by 12 actors who had trained and performed at the Stratford Festival. Considered the best year-round repertory company in Canada, Soulpepper has presented such acclaimed productions as Anton Chekov’s Uncle Vanya (2001, 2002, 2008) and Tony Kushner’s Angels in America (2013). Since relocating to Toronto’s Distillery District in 2006, Soulpepper has presented such Canadian plays as Sharon Pollock’s Doc (2010), John Murrell’s Waiting for the Parade (2010), and Ins Choi’s Kim’s Convenience (2012). In January 2018, the company was rocked by allegations of sexual harassment against founding artistic director Albert Schultz and accompanying lawsuits against Schultz and Soulpepper.

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Science Centres

Canada is home to more than 40 science centres, planetariums, children's museums and related institutions that have been established to advance scientific literacy by making science learning fun and accessible.

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Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec

The Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec in Quebec City houses the world’s most extensive collection of Québécois art, ranging from the paintings of such 19th-century masters as James Wilson Morrice and Cornelius Krieghoff to contemporary artists such as the Quebec City-based collective BGL. It also holds collections of early, modern and contemporary Canadian art, including an extensive collection of Inuit art. Since it opened in 1933, the Musée has designed, organized and hosted hundreds of exhibitions. Expanded in 1991 and again in 2016, the four-pavilion complex includes numerous exhibition galleries and workshops, an auditorium and a sculpture garden. The Musée also plays a role in the community through its library, educational service, and photographic documentation centre.

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Orpheum Theatre (Vancouver)

Opened in 1927 as a movie theatre palace and vaudeville house, Vancouver’s Orpheum Theatre was for many years Canada's largest and most opulent theatre. A much-loved concert space and architectural gem, the 2,688-seat venue located at 884 Granville Street was revitalized in the mid-1970s and recognized as a National Historic Site in 1979. Operated by Vancouver Civic Theatres, it remains one of Canada's premier concert halls and presents a wide variety of classical and contemporary performances. It is the permanent home of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra (VSO) and has been the main venue for the Vancouver Bach Choir, the Vancouver Cantata Singers, the Vancouver Chamber Choir and the Vancouver Recital Society.

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Canadian Broadcasting Centre

The Canadian Broadcasting Centre was developed as the result of a proposal call process in which the Cadillac Fairview Corporation Limited was selected to develop the 9.3 acre site, owned by the CBC, and build the centre, which was then leased to the CBC on a long-term basis.

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Roy Thomson Hall

Roy Thomson Hall. 2,630-seat Toronto concert hall, located in the block bounded by King, Simcoe and Wellington streets. It is managed by The Corporation of Massey Hall and Roy Thomson Hall and is home to the Toronto Symphony Orchestra (TSO) and the Toronto Mendelssohn Choir.

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Shaftesbury Hall

Shaftesbury Hall. The auditorium in Toronto's first YMCA, built at Queen and James streets in 1872 to designs by the architects Smith and Gemmel. The hall was on the ground floor with a direct entrance from the street, a double gallery, and a seating capacity of about 1700.

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Sports Facilities

Sports facilities in Canada - including arenas, stadiums and curling rinks, swimming pools and specialized Olympic installations - are among the country's most important cultural buildings.

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Empress Hotel

The Empress Hotel is a luxury waterfront hotel and national historic site in Victoria, British Columbia. Designed primarily by architect Francis M. Rattenbury, it is noted for its picturesque Château-style design and decadent interiors. It opened in 1908 and was built by the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) as part of its network of hotels, which also includes the Banff Springs Hotel, Chateau Lake Louise and Le Château Frontenac. Now officially known as the Fairmont Empress, the hotel, along with its afternoon tea, is arguably Victoria’s most popular tourist attraction.