Search for "New France"

Displaying 61-80 of 174 results
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Sunday Schools

Raikes's innovation, quickly copied in Britain, was brought to Canada mainly by the PRESBYTERIAN and CONGREGATIONAL churches.

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Resistance and Residential Schools

Residential schools were government-sponsored religious schools that many Indigenous children were forced to attend. They were established to assimilate Indigenous children into Euro-Canadian culture. Indigenous parents and children did not simply accept the residential-school system. Indigenous peoples fought against – and engaged with – the state, schools and other key players in the system. For the duration of the residential-school era, parents acted in the best interests of their children and communities. The children responded in ways that would allow them to survive. 

Credit: M. Meikle / Library and Archives Canada / PA-101771

Inuit children who lived too far away and had to stay at school during the summer. Anglican Mission School. Credit: M. Meikle / Library and Archives Canada / PA-101771

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Singing Schools

The 18th-century US institution of local singing classes for sacred music had its counterpart in the Maritimes and in some parts of both Lower and Upper Canada between the 1770s and Confederation.

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Piano Playing and Teaching

The piano has maintained a position of prominence in many Canadian homes since the late 18th century. Canadians have thrived on this instrument, and Canada has produced some of the best pianists, piano instructors, and piano methods in the latter part of the 20th century.

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SchoolNet

SchoolNet was an educational project launched in 1993 by federal, provincial and territorial governments, educational organizations and industry partners. Their goals were to link Canadian schools and libraries (particularly those in remote areas) via the Internet and to foster the creation of a Canadian educational website in English and French.

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Frontier Thesis

The Frontier thesis was formulated 1893, when American historian Frederick Jackson Turner theorized that the availability of unsettled land throughout much of American history was the most important factor determining national development.

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North-West Schools Question

The North-West Schools Question was a conflict between church and state for control of education in the North-West Territories (now Saskatchewan and Alberta) in the late-19th century. The controversy was similar to other educational crises across Canada, and reflected the larger national debate about the future of Canada as a bilingual and bicultural country.

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Western University

Ontario's third largest university, Western University was founded in 1878 as the Western University of London, a denominational school of the Church of England.

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Dalhousie University

Its auspicious beginnings were soon marred by governmental indifference and sectarian rivalry. Both the colonial establishment and the college's board of governors were unenthusiastic, favouring instead the precedence of King's College.

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Diorama

Diorama, museum exhibit which creates the illusion of a natural or historic scene. Typically, mounted animals and preserved plants blend imperceptibly into a realistic background painting, simulating a natural habitat (the name habitat group is sometimes used).

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Laurentian University

Laurentian University, in Greater Sudbury, Ont, was founded in 1960; instruction is in both French and English. Laurentian University dates from 1913 when the Roman Catholic Collège du Sacré-Coeur was established in Sudbury. In 1957 it became the University of Sudbury.

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University College

A public post-secondary educational institution, the university college was a hybrid institution in Canada. As its name implies, the university college incorporated many of the traditional values and culture of both the university and the community college.

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Distance Learning

Distance education or distance learning commonly refers to formal education offerings where instructor and learner are physically separated and where learners can study appropriately designed materials at a place, time and pace of their own choosing.