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Trades and Labor Congress of Canada

Founded in 1883, the Trades and Labor Congress of Canada (TLC) was the first union central to take lasting root in Canada. Principally bringing together craft unions, the TLC was the largest workers’ organization in Canada at the turn of the 20th century. The TLC saw its membership fluctuate in the 20th century because of the fierce competition between national and international unions and the rise of industrial unionism. In 1956, the organization merged with the Canadian Congress of Labour to become the Canadian Labour Congress.

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Torstar Corporation

 Torstar Corporation, a broadly based information and entertainment communications company, publishes the TORONTO STAR. Other newspaper publishing interests include Metroland Media Group, commercial printers and publishers, and CTVglobemedia.

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United Farmers of Canada

The United Farmers of Canada was a militant farmers' organization established 1926 as the United Farmers of Canada (Saskatchewan Section). It combined the radical Farmers' Union of Canada and the more conservative Saskatchewan GRAIN GROWERS' ASSOCIATION.

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Vancouver Island Coal Strike

 Vancouver Island Coal Strike began on 16 Sept 1912 when miners at Cumberland declared a "holiday" to protest the firing of Oscar Mottishaw. Canadian Collieries, recent purchaser of the Dunsmuir Mines, locked them out and hired Chinese and recruits from Britain and the US as strikebreakers.

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United Farmers of Alberta

In 1915 it organized the United Farm Women of Alberta, which energetically campaigned for WOMEN'S SUFFRAGE (gained in Alberta in 1916) and struggled to secure better education and health services in rural Alberta.

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Wardair International Ltd

 Wardair International Ltd, with head offices in Toronto, was an international and domestic airline incorporated in Alberta in 1953 as Wardair Ltd. Initially a bush charter airline based in Yellowknife, NWT, the name was changed in 1962 to Wardair Canada Ltd. It became a public company in 1967.

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Wage and Price Controls

Wage and Price Controls are comprehensive government restrictions on the maximum rate at which wages and prices may increase during a specified time period. Wage and price controls can be distinguished from other types of government price and wage intervention by 2 characteristics.

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Steinberg Inc

Steinberg Inc was a diversified Canadian retailing organization with head offices in Montréal. It was incorporated in 1930 as Steinberg's Limited, and adopted its present name in 1978.

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Stelco Inc

The Steel Company of Canada (Stelco) was founded in 1910. In 2007, the company — based in Hamilton, Ontario — was bought by the United States Steel Corporation, and its name changed to U.S. Steel Canada.

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Sydney Steel Corporation

The government, faced with a socially unacceptable shutdown, formed a CROWN CORPORATION to keep the industry alive. The plant consists of 2 small blast furnaces and several basic open-hearth furnaces, with an annual raw-steel capacity of about 910 000 tonnes.

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Agriculture and Food

Canada's agriculture and food industries have changed greatly in the years since the Second World War. Growth in Canada’s economy, and associated social changes, have altered the way food is produced, processed, handled, sold and consumed.

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Flour Milling

In North America in precontact times, Indigenous people hand-ground corn and other substances (eg, acorns) into flour used in porridge, flat cakes, etc. By the middle of the 16th century, the first European settlers had arrived in New France, bringing with them their flour milling technology.

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Career counselling

Career counselling. Musically talented children wishing to study music seriously usually receive counselling from their music teachers, both private and school.

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Voyageurs

Voyageurs were independent contractors, workers or minor partners in companies involved in the fur trade. They were licensed to transport goods to trading posts and were usually forbidden to do any trading of their own. The fur trade changed over the years, as did the groups of men working in it. In the 17th century, voyageurs were often coureurs des bois — unlicensed traders responsible for delivering trade goods from suppliers to Indigenous peoples. The implementation of the trading licence system in 1681 set voyageurs apart from coureurs des bois, who were then considered outlaws of sorts. Today, the word voyageur, like the term coureur des bois, evokes the romantic image of men canoeing across the continent in search of furs. Their life was full of perilous adventure, gruelling work and cheerful camaraderie.

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Wholesale Trade

Wholesalers (also called distributors) buy goods for resale to retailers (see RETAIL TRADE), industrial, commercial, governmental, institutional and professional users or to other wholesalers. They also act as agents in connection with such sales.