Search for ""

Displaying 61-80 of 810 results
Macleans

Ontario Implements Tax Break

It was perhaps ironic that Ontario's controversial Conservative government could not even cut taxes without sparking an agonized debate. Eleven months after Premier Mike Harris swept to power, he fulfilled a key election promise in last week's budget, introducing the first stages of a 30.

Article

Genetic Diseases

Genetic diseases result from chromosome abnormalities or mutant genes showing a specific pattern of inheritance. In addition, genetic factors are involved in susceptibility to some nongenetic DISEASES.

Article

German Furniture

Furniture of Germanic derivation has come to Canada as a result of emigration from Germany and from Pennsylvania (see GERMANS). Traditional German furniture in Europe evolved over several centuries to serve the needs of ordinary, primarily rural, people.

Macleans

Melatonin Banned

That frustration is fuelled not only by melatonin's proven ability to counter insomnia and jet lag, but also by an array of experts touting it as a wonder drug that can extend life and help to combat a wide variety of illnesses, including AIDS, cancer and epilepsy.

Macleans

Male and Female Brains

It began almost by accident. In an effort to uncover the causes of dyslexia, psychologist Sandra Witelson decided in 1970 to conduct an experiment involving dyslexic and other children at a Hamilton grade school. Because dyslexia affects mostly males, Witelson planned to use boys only.

Macleans

Olestra Controversy

Pass the potato chips. Olestra, a new synthetic food oil with zero calories, is promising to take the fat - and the guilt - out of greasy junk food. "This is something people really want," says Chris Hassall, a senior scientist with Cincinnati-based Procter & Gamble Co.

Macleans

Electric Cars to be Marketed

O'Callaghan was one of the first people in Canada to drive the Impact, a compact electric vehicle (known as an EV) that will soon be the subject of a joint research project by General Motors Corp., B.C. Hydro and the British Columbia government.

Article

Fossil

  Fossil [Lat fossilis, "dug up"], trace of an ancient animal or plant preserved in the Earth's crust. Palaeontology is the modern, scientific study of fossils, but these curious objects have attracted attention since ancient times.

Macleans

V-chip Technology

Tim Collings is one of those techies who uses the word "neat" as often as some Canadians use "eh." A soft-spoken engineering instructor at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, B.C., the 34-year-old Collings clearly gets excited by gadgetry.

Macleans

Life on Mars?

It was an evening in summer upon the placid and temperate planet Mars. Up and down green wine canals, boats as delicate as bronze flowers drifted ....

Article

Ocean Ranger

On 15 February 1982, the world's largest semisubmersible drill rig, Ocean Ranger, capsized and sank in a fierce storm on the Grand Banks with the loss of all 84 crew members, 56 of whom were Newfoundlanders.

Article

Glaciation

Glaciation is the formation, movement and recession of glaciers. Glaciation was much more extensive in the past, when much of the world was covered in large, continental ice sheets. Currently, glaciers cover about 10 per cent of the world's land area (14.9 million km2).

Article

Gravity

Gravity, the fundamental physical property of attraction between all bodies, is here considered mainly as it relates to the study of the Earth.

Article

Geology

Earth is 70.8% covered by water, but only with the development of sonar techniques has it become possible to describe the solid earth below the oceans. With increasingly sophisticated satellite observations, relatively fine structural details (eg, areas of volcanic activity) can be seen.