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Chute Montmorency

Chute Montmorency, located 13 km east of Québec City at the mouth of Rivière Montmorency where it empties into the St Lawrence River, is the highest waterfall in the province of Québec and the eighth-highest in Canada.

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Lake Manitoba

Lake Manitoba, 4624 km2, elev 248 m, is one of 3 large lakes occupying the southern half of Manitoba. A narrow, irregular lake, about 200 km long with marshy shores, it is fed mainly from Lake WINNIPEGOSIS, which lies to the northwest, and drains northeast via the Dauphin River to Lake WINNIPEG.

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Miscou Island

Miscou Island, 64 km2, comprises the most eastern part of Gloucester County, New Brunswick, on the west side of the Gulf of St Lawrence and at the entrance to CHALEUR BAY.

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Mountain Range

Mountain ranges generally belong to the same geological structure, and consist of a series of peaks and ridges surrounded by lowlands and valleys. There are many mountain ranges in Canada, including the Rocky Mountains, the St. Elias Mountains and the Laurentian Mountains.

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Lac Mégantic (lake)

Lac Mégantic, 26 km2, elev 395 m, 75 m deep, is located in a depression of the Appalachians in southern Québec, 6 km from the US border. LAC-MÉGANTIC, the only town of the region, is located at its outlet, which is the source of the Rivière CHAUDIÈRE.

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Nueltin Lake

Nueltin Lake, 2279 km2, elev 278 m, max length 144 km, is located on the border of Nunavut and northeastern Manitoba, about 660 km south of the Arctic Circle. An irregularly shaped lake, it has a heavily indented shoreline and contains numerous small islands.

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Melville Peninsula

The Melville Peninsula is approximately 400 km long and 100 km wide. It is joined to the Canadian mainland by Rae Isthmus, is bounded on its west side by Committee Bay and is separated from BAFFIN ISLAND in the north by Fury and Hecla Strait; it faces FOXE BASIN in the east.

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Mont Sainte-Anne

Internationally known for its SKIING facilities, 7 World Cup races have been held there since 1969. The area is superbly equipped; downhill skiers and snowboarders enjoy 51 runs totalling 60 km (15 km are illuminated for night skiing).

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Monashee Mountains

Monashee Mountains are a 400-km-long range of varied origin in southern BC. To the W they merge with the Okanagan and Shuswap highlands; their eastern boundary is the S-flowing COLUMBIA RIVER. The highest point in the range is 3375 m.

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Muskeg

Muskeg (from Cree maskek and Ojibwe mashkiig, meaning “grassy bog”) is a type of northern landscape characterized by a wet environment, vegetation and peat deposits. Chiefly used in North America, the term muskeg escapes precise scientific definition. It encompasses various types of wetlands found in the boreal zone, including bogs, fens, swamps and mires. In Canada, muskeg and other peatlands cover up to 1.2 million km2, or 12 per cent of the country’s surface.

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Navy Island

Navy Island is the only Canadian island in the Niagara River. The 127.9 ha island is named after a British shipyard (1793) where the first naval vessels to sail the Upper Great Lakes were constructed.

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North Cape

North Cape, also called North Port, is the northern extremity of Prince Edward Island, dividing Northumberland Strait from the Gulf of St Lawrence proper.

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North Pole

The North Pole did not become a goal of ARCTIC EXPLORATION until fairly late; the few early expeditions that tried to reach it were looking for a polar route to the East rather than for the pole itself. W.E.

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Northwest Passage

The Northwest Passage is a sea corridor through Canada's Arctic archipelago and along the northern coast of North America. European explorers searched in vain for the passage for 300 years, intent on finding a commercially viable western sea route between Europe and Asia.

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Rivière Nottaway

Rivière Nottaway, 776 km (via Rivière Bell to head of Rivière Mégiscane), rises in west-central Québec and flows north via Lacs Parent and Quévillon into Lac Matagami. Here it is joined by its chief headstream, Rivière Waswanipi, and then drains northwest through Lac Soscumica.