Search for "Food"

Displaying 1-20 of 24 results
timeline event

Nearly 60 Per Cent of Families Struggling to Buy Food, Poll Finds

A poll conducted by the Angus Reid Institute found that 57 per cent of Canadians had struggled recently to feed their families — an increase from 36 per cent in 2019, the last time a similar poll was conducted. Supply chain issues sparked by the COVID-19 pandemic had led to an inflation rate of 5.1 per cent — the highest in 30 years. Labour and product shortages were also wreaking havoc on the business of grocery stores, which observers said could further threaten food security.

Article

Inuit Country Food in Canada

Country food is a term that describes traditional Inuit food, including game meats, migratory birds, fish and foraged foods. In addition to providing nourishment, country food is an integral part of Inuit identity and culture, and contributes to self-sustainable communities. Environmental and socioeconomic changes have threatened food security, making country food more expensive and difficult to harvest. Despite these challenges, the Inuit, in partnership with various levels of government and non-profit organizations, continue to work towards improving access to country food.

Article

Crops

Crops are plant species grown for human or animal consumption or for special purposes (e.g., flax, tobacco). In Canada, most major crops grown are used for food and feed.

Article

Agriculture and Food

Canada's agriculture and food industries have changed greatly in the years since the Second World War. Growth in Canada’s economy, and associated social changes, have altered the way food is produced, processed, handled, sold and consumed.

Article

Marcellus Gilmore Edson

Marcellus Gilmore Edson, chemist, pharmacist (born 7 February 1849 in Bedford, QC; died 6 March 1940 in Montreal, QC). In 1884, Edson received a patent for the manufacture of a peanut paste, which he named “peanut-candy.” Edson’s patent for peanut-candy has been recognized as a forerunner to the commercially available peanut butter or spread. (See also Legume; Oilseed Crops.)

Article

Food Insecurity in Canada

Household food insecurity— the inadequate or insecure access to food due to financial constraints — is a serious public health problem in Canada. In 2017–18, 1 in 8 households were food insecure. This amounted to over 4.4 million Canadians. Of that number, 1.2 million were children under 18 years. While food banks are a well-known public response to food insecurity, most food insecure households do not use food banks and there is no evidence that food charity is a durable solution. There is wide consensus that governments need to act on food insecurity through income-based interventions.

Article

Wild Nuts in Canada

Nuts are the hard-shelled fruits of flowering trees or shrubs. Within each shell are one or more seed kernels that are easily separated from the outer shell. Most nuts are edible and nutritious, and are sought after by many animals as well as people. There are about 20 edible nut species native to Canada. Most of these species are found in the Great Lakes-St Lawrence and deciduous forest regions of southeastern Canada, including the American hazelnut (Corylus americana), American beechnut (Fagus grandifolia) and black walnut (Juglans nigra). Nuts found in western Canada include the beaked hazelnut (Corylus cornuta), whitebark pine seeds (Pinus albicaulis), and garry oak acorns (Quercus garryana). Virtually all are known to have been used as food by Indigenous Peoples. Some are still harvested and used today, but most have been replaced in peoples’ diets by imported nut species such as European filbert (Corylus avellana), English or Persian walnut (Juglans regia), American pecan (Carya illinoinensis) and cashews (Anacardium occidentale). This article includes descriptions of the most widely-used wild nuts in Canada.

Article

Plant Gene Resources of Canada

Plant Gene Resources of Canada (PGRC) is part of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. As Canada’s national seed gene bank it protects, preserves and enhances the genetic diversity of Canada’s important agricultural plants and their wild relatives (see Genetics; Seed Plants). Since its foundation in 1970, PGRC has played a major role in protecting Canada’s agricultural crops (see Agriculture in Canada). In doing so, it also helps protect biodiversity, which is disappearing in many places, and contributes towards food security at home and around the world. (See also Food insecurity in Canada.)

Click here for definitions of key terms used in this article.

Article

Candy Bar Protest

The Candy Bar Protest, also known as the Five Cent War, Candy Bar War, Candy Bar Strike, or the Chocolate Candy Bar Strike, was a protest that took place in the spring of 1947. Children in numerous Canadian cities organized public protests or boycotts against the rise of chocolate bar prices (see Confectionary Industry). The protest was generally well-received by the Canadian public, but it fell apart after unsubstantiated allegations that the effort was backed by communists. (See also Communist Party of Canada.)

Article

Smoked Meat

Originating in Eastern Europe, Montreal-style smoked meat is a traditional Montreal dish, often served as a sandwich, for which the city is famous. The term also refers to the meat itself, i.e., beef brisket which is salted, seasoned and smoked. Due to its diverse origins, there are many variations of this dish. While it is strongly associated with Montreal, it is increasingly being found in restaurants and delicatessens throughout Canada. The term “Montreal smoked meat” is often used, regardless of where the meat has been prepared.

Article

Caesar Cocktail

The Caesar, also known as the Bloody Caesar, is considered Canada’s national cocktail. The key ingredients are vodka, clam juice, tomato juice, spices and Worcestershire sauce. It is typically served in a highball glass rimmed with celery salt and garnished with a celery stalk, olives and lime. Food and beverage worker Walter Chell invented the Caesar in Calgary, Alberta, in 1969. Since then, the drink’s popularity and origin have made it a national cultural icon. Canadians drink more than 400 million Caesars annually. However, it has not achieved significant reach beyond Canada.  

Article

Farm Credit Canada

Farm Credit Canada (FCC), known as the Farm Credit Corporation until 2001, was established under the Farm Credit Act of 1959. FCC is Canada's largest agricultural term lender and is dedicated  to serving the financial needs of Canadian farmers. FCC is a Crown corporation that reports to the Canadian Parliament through the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food. (See also Department of Agriculture.)

Article

Bannock

Bannock is a form of bread that served as a staple in the diets of early settlers and fur traders. Most Indigenous nations in North America have some version of bannock. Inuit call it palauga, Mi’kmaq luskinikn, and Ojibwe ba‘wezhiganag. The word derives from the Gaelicbannach, meaning morsel, which in turn likely came from the Latin panis, which means bread. Bannock is usually unleavened, oval-shaped and flat. The version that we know today came from Scotland. In its most rudimentary form, it is made of flour, water, and fat or lard. Milk, salt, and sugar are often added, depending on the recipe. It is traditionally cooked by mixing the ingredients into a large, round biscuit and baked in a frying pan. Today, most often, bannock is baked in the oven, making it heavy and dense; or it is pan-fried, light and fluffy; or it is deep-fried.

Article

Pawpaw

The pawpaw (Asimina triloba) is a shrub or small tree of the Annonaceae, or custard-apple, family. It is the only member of the custard-apple family that grows in Canada. Sometimes called dog-banana, the pawpaw’s fruit is edible. It is believed that Indigenous people, including the Erie and Onondaga, introduced the tree to Southern Ontario from the United States. The plant is a beautiful ornamental shrub due to its large leaves and red-purplish flowers. Recently, this small tree has attracted the attention of researchers as a potential anticancer drug alternative.

timeline event

Food Insecurity in Nunavut Worsened After Government Subsidy Program, Research Finds

A study conducted at the Department of Nutritional Sciences at the University of Toronto and published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal found that rates of food insecurity in Nunavut’s 10 largest communities have risen 13 per cent since federal subsidies designed to make food more affordable were introduced in 2011. Andrée-Anne Fafard St-Germain, the lead researcher in the study, called for an inquiry “to determine the extent to which similar initiatives adapted to the needs and realities of northern populations could affect food insecurity.”

Article

Great Canadian Maple Syrup Heist

Over the course of several months in 2011 and 2012, a team of thieves stole approximately 2,700 tonnes of maple syrup from a strategic maple syrup reserve maintained in Quebec (see Maple Syrup Industry). The theft has been popularly dubbed as the Great Maple Syrup Heist. At the time of the heist, the stolen maple syrup was valued at nearly $18 million. The heist may be one of the largest thefts in Canadian history.

Article

Agriculture in Canada (Plain-Language Summary)

Agriculture is the practice of growing crops and raising animals for food. It can also be called farming. Farming is important to Canada. Now, Canadian farms face many challenges. Two of the biggest challenges are climate change and soil conservation.

This article is a plain-language summary of Agriculture in Canada. If you are interested in reading about this topic in more depth, please see our full-length entry, Agriculture in Canada.