Alberta Research Council

The Alberta Research Council, the oldest provincial research organization, was established by order-in-council as the Scientific and Industrial Research Council of Alberta in 1921. Instrumental in founding the organization were J.L. COTÉ, provincial secretary, and H.M.

Alberta Research Council

The Alberta Research Council, the oldest provincial research organization, was established by order-in-council as the Scientific and Industrial Research Council of Alberta in 1921. Instrumental in founding the organization were J.L. Coté, provincial secretary, and H.M. Tory, president of the University of Alberta.

In 1930 a provincial Act formalized the council's mandate to inventory and promote development of natural resources. Provincial funding for the organization was temporarily cut short by the Great Depression, and the council was governed by the University of Alberta from 1933 to 1942. In 1951 a revised Act formally established it as independent of the university and appointed its first research director, Nathaniel Grace.

ARC is a Provincial corporation that works with industry to bring technological developments into commercial practice. ARC performs applied research and development and provides advice and technical information to a wide range of organizations, from small start-up firms to large multinational corporations. ARC is recognized for its expertise in biotechnology, information, manufacturing and natural resources. It provides research and development services to bridge the gap between basic research and market development. From sites in Calgary, Devon and Edmonton, ARC works with industry, universities and other groups in a variety of arrangements, including fee-for-service, joint ventures and consortia.

ARC's president, appointed by the council's board of directors, presides over approximately 350 employees. The board comprises 15 members from business, university and government and is chaired by a member of the provincial legislature.