de Havilland Beaver

De Havilland Beaver, DHC-2, successor to the NOORDUYN NORSEMAN as the all-purpose bush plane of the Canadian North. Its specifications were based on results of a questionnaire circulated by "Punch" DICKINS , and it


de Havilland Beaver

 De Havilland Beaver, DHC-2, successor to the NOORDUYN NORSEMAN as the all-purpose bush plane of the Canadian North. Its specifications were based on results of a questionnaire circulated by "Punch" DICKINS, and it first flew 16 August 1947. Generous power and a special wing/flap system designed by R.D. Hiscocks gave it excellent STOL capabilities; it could take off in 181 m. Carrying a pilot, 6 passengers and heavy loads, it saw service in both polar regions, in African deserts and in airfields high in the Andes. Service in Antarctica was so valuable that a lake, glacier and island were named after it. By 1965, some 1600 were operating in 63 countries, with the biggest customer being the US Army. There are 6 in museums, including one, the prototype, CF-FHB, in the National Aviation Museum, Ottawa.