Fort Anne

For the next 40 years, the British at Fort Anne maintained a precarious position in the Acadian-dominated province and were frequently attacked by French and Indian raiding parties. The status of the fort declined with the founding of Halifax (1749) and the expulsion of the Acadians (1755).


Fort Anne

 Fort Anne, situated at the junction of the south bank of the Annapolis River and Basin (Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia), was initially the site of the second French (Acadian) community of PORT-ROYAL. Captured by New England and British troops in 1710, the fort and town were renamed Fort Anne and Annapolis Royal after Queen Anne. As one of the oldest continuously occupied sites in North America, this settlement became the first capital of peninsular NS following the Treaty of UTRECHT (1713).

For the next 40 years, the British at Fort Anne maintained a precarious position in the Acadian-dominated province and were frequently attacked by French and Indian raiding parties. The status of the fort declined with the founding of Halifax (1749) and the expulsion of the Acadians (1755). In disrepair, Fort Anne was transferred to the National Parks Service in 1917 and became one of Canada's first national historic parks.